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North Idaho College • Coeur d'Alene • Social & Behavioral Sciences • History


Explorations in the History of Civilizations - Discoveries and European Expansion HIST-207D

  • Fall 2012

  • Section 01

  • 3.0 Credits

  • 08/27/2012 to 12/20/2012

  • Modified 11/09/2012



Contact Information


Instructor: Prof. Paul D. Brasil

Email: pdbrasil@nic.edu
Office: LKH 218D
Phone: (208) 769-3397

Office Hours: MW 1:00-2:30

Online Office Hour: M 3:00-4:00;  F 1:00-5:00

Meeting Times


Internet Class. (There are NO on-campus meetings)

Description


Topics in Explorations in the History of Civilizations vary by semester and will be determined annually by history faculty. This course provides an in-depth study of discoveries and European Expansion. The class will consist of reading, discussion, lectures and media focusing on the issues and forces contributing to discoveries and European expansion. Lecture: 3 hours per week

Materials


Required Texts:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580

William D. Phillips, Jr. and Carla Rahn Phillips, The Worlds of Christopher Columbus

Charles R. Boxer, ed., Tragic History of the Sea,

Articles and chapters available from the course site [See Articles File for topic]

 

Recommended Texts:

Samuel Eliot Morison, The Great Explorers

K. G. Davies, The North Atlantic World in the Seventeenth Century

Lyle N. McAlister, Spain and Portugal in the New World, 1492-1700

 

 

Recommended Style Manuals:

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 7th ed.

OR

Style guide cite by Diana Hacker at http://dianahacker.com/pocket/resdoc.html

Outcomes


Students will gain a working knowledge of the main events of the Age of Discovery/European expansion.

Students will become familiar with the individuals who played an important role in the Age of Discovery/European expansion.

Students will explore the development of seafaring technology and the problems of life at sea in the Age of Discovery.

Students will become acquainted cultural and economic activities of the overseas empires.

Students will gain an understanding of the social dynamics and race relations of the overseas empires.

Students will sample and evaluate primary sources from the Age of Discovery/European expansion.

Students will become acquainted with some of the secondary literature and the historiographical debates of the Age of Discovery.

Assessment


Short Answer Assignments – 700 Points--Due Date: (See Course Page on Blackboard for due dates).

Essay Projects – 300 Points--Due Date: (See Angel Course Page for due dates.

Course Policies


Instructor reserves the right to make changes due to Unforeseen Circumstances

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. FIRST WEEK PARTICIPATION: See Welcome Page of Blackboard for Introductions assignment. It is required of all students during the first week.

2. Attendance & Participation are expected, and are necessary for good performance.

3. Do all Required Readings from the textbook and other sources listed on the course Schedule bellow.

4. It is your responsibility to turn in all assignments

5. Failure to complete all exams and/or writing assignments may result in failure of the course.

6. Good Writing & Reading Skills. History courses are writing and reading intensive courses.  It is recommended that students have good writing and reading skills in order to succeed in history courses.

SPORTS RELATED ABSENCES:

Lecture Classes: If you are going to be absent from class because of sports, your coach needs to send me a memo listing the names of students and the date of absences at least a week in advance. Otherwise the absence will NOT be excused.

Lecture & Internet Classes: Remember that if you are going to be way because of sports or other reasons on a day when an assignment is due, you must to turn it in BEFORE the due date.

PAPER POLICY:

All papers MUST be double spaced and printed in black ink with 12 point Courier or TNR font.

Papers should be printed into .pdf format you may do this from Word 2007 or for older versions with a freeware program called PrimoPDF.

Late papers will be penalized. No papers are accepted after the graded papers have been returned to the students. Papers must have a bibliography and source citations for every quote and paragraph.

For technical reasons a student can submit the paper by e-mail within 48 hours of due date. Assignments must then be reposted to appropriate drop box or Discussion Board as soon as possible.

Here is a list of what I look for when I grade major essay assignments:

1) Is there an INTRODUCTION? How well does it tell the reader what the paper is about?

2) Is there a CONCLUSION? How well does it sum up the paper?

3) Did the student answer questions assigned? Did the student address all the points asked for?

4) CONTENT: Did the student give examples? Facts Correct? How much detail did the student go into?

5) QUALITY OF ANALYSIS: Does the student make good use of evidence? Are the arguments coherent?

6) EVIDENCE: did the student read all the assigned reading? Does the paper provide support based on PRIMARY sources.

7) Did the student CITE THE SOURCE for each paragraph and quote in correct format?

8) Is there a BIBLIOGRAPHY in correct format?

9) QUALITY OF WRITING: Spelling! Grammar! Is the paper well organized?

 

SHORT ANSWER & DISCUSSION BOARD ASSIGNMENT POLICY:

All Discussion Board & Short Answer Assignments must be done in essay format. Each assignment must have a bibliography and source citations for every quote and paragraph.

Any assignment submitted by email for technical reasons MUST then be reposted to appropriate Assignment location as soon as it is operational.

Short Answer Assignments & Discussion Board Assignments Grading Expectations: Here is what I generally look for:

1) Did the student answer question assigned?

2) Did the student address all the points asked for?

3) How much detail did the student go into? Did the student give examples? Are facts correct?

4) Is there evidence that the student read all the assigned reading?

5) Did the student cite the source for each paragraph and quote in correct format?

6) Is there a bibliography in correct format?

UNACCEPTABLE WEBSITES:

The following websites will not be accepted in any assignments for this course.

For the purposes of accurate research, and more effective learning and research, The following websites are not accepted within any assignment submitted to this course.

as   sparknotes.com

gradesaver.com

wikipedia.com

gradebooster.com

answers.com

 

 

REASON:

These websites are not websites that have any proof of articles or research that are nor “peer reviewed” and academically accepted as accurate and factual.

For use of these Points will be deducted and will significantly reduce, by more than 25%, your grade on the assignment.

If you wish, I am more than happy to be of guidance and assistance to you as to sites, which will greatly guide and direct to earning the highest, and desired, grade possible.

Wikipedia is not an acceptable independent academic source for written assignments.

Wikipedia is not validated by expert academic peer review authorities, and is by Wikipedia’s own admission not frequently reviewed for factual validity and currency.

Wikipedia can be used as a portal to gain deeper access to specific topics from valid sources, but cannot be listed as a source on research-based papers.

Supporting Statements: The following Wikipedia Statements directly quoted from the Wikipedia.org web site to emphasize the question of validity of Wikipedia information and support this campus academic affairs policy:

WIKIPEDIA MAKES NO GUARANTEE OF VALIDITY (2007), retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Disclaimers

"Please be advised that nothing found here has necessarily been reviewed by people with the expertise required to provide you with complete, accurate or reliable information...Wikipedia cannot guarantee the validity of the information found here", and "Wikipedia is not uniformly peer reviewed".

RELIABILITY OF WIKIPEDIA (2007), retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliability_of_Wikipedia

"It (Wikipedia) provides a good starting point for research, and that articles are, in general, reasonably sound. However, it does suffer from omissions and inaccuracies and sometimes these can be serious."

GRADING:

A Range = Outstanding. All assignment sections are turned in. Projects reflect thoughtful, analytical thinking and a thorough understanding of historical events and trends. Course participation and professionalism are exceptional. Misses less than 10% classes.

B Range = All assignments are turned in above average, but not outstanding work. Demonstrates understanding of historical events, but the analytical thinking is weaker than that for an “A”. Misses less than 20% classes

C Range = Average. All assignments are turned in, but indicates an average understanding of historical events. Work tends to be narrative rather than analytical. There is a need for improvement AND/OR written work is "fair." Course participation or professionalism may need improvement, AND/OR misses less than 30% classes.

D Range = Below average. All assignment sections turned in, but writing is purely narrative, there is no analysis and barely answers the question assigned AND/OR assignments are incomplete, course participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Misses less than 50%.

F Range = Fail: Assignments are not turned in or are “late without the instructor approval” and/or are substantially below average and fails to answer question AND/OR participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Plagiarizing of course work or other unprofessional behavior will result in disciplinary action.

Grade Scale (Based on percentages)

 

87-89 = B+

77-79 = C+

67-69 = D+

0-59 = F

93+ = A

83-86 = B

73-76 = C

63-66 = D

 

90-92 = A-

80-82 = B-

70-72 = C-

60-62 = D-

 

Schedule


PART I: THE VOYGES & THE DISCOVERIES

 

I. THE EUROPEAN BACKGROUND & THE DEVELOPMENT OF NAVIGATION & SHIPPING TECHNOLOGY

 

Required reading:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 11-23; 37-41, 123-143

William D. Phillips, Jr. & Carla R. Phillips, The Worlds of Christopher Columbus, pp. 1-51, 64-85

Samuel Eliot Morison, The Great Explorers, pp. 3-38. [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

John H. Parry, The Discovery of the Sea, pp. 3-62; 139-163.

Charles R. Boxer, The Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800, pp. xix-xxvi; 1-53 [pb xx-xxvii, 1-59].

Geoffrey Parker, “Europe and the wider world, 1500-1750: The Military Balance,” in James D. Tracy, ed., The Political Economy of Merchant Empires: State Power and World Trade, 1350-1750 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), pp. 161-195.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

II. NORTH AFRICA AND THE ATLANTIC ISLANDS

                                                               

Required reading:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 37-73; 109-110.

William D. Phillips, Jr. & Carla R. Phillips, The Worlds of Christopher Columbus, pp. 51-63

ARTICLE: Jane H. Ohlmeyer, “’Civilization of those rude parts’: Colonization within Britain and Ireland, 1580s-1640s,” in Nicholas Cany, ed., The Origins of Empire, pp. 124-146. [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

Lyle N. McAlister, Spain and Portugal in the New World, 1492-1700, pp. 41-43; 47-55; 63-65.

Eduardo Aznar Vallejo, “The Conquest of the Canary Islands,” in Stuart B. Schwartz, ed., Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting, and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era, (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), pp. 134-156

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

 

III. THE DISCOVERY OF THE SEA: THE COASTING OF AFRICA AND THE SEARCH FOR A SEA ROUTE TO INDIA

 

Required reading: 

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 74-122.

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic) 

Ivana Elbl, “The State of Research Henry ‘the Navigator’,” Journal of Medieval History 27 (2001) 79-99

Ivana Elbl, "Man of His Time (and Peers): A New Look at Henry the Navigator," Luso-Brazilian Review 28 (no. 2, Winter, 1991): 73-89.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

 

IV. THE DISCOVERY OF THE SEA: COLUMBUS & daGAMA

 

Required reading:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 144-186.

William D. Phillips, Jr. & Carla R. Phillips, The Worlds of Christopher Columbus, p. 85-154, 241-273.

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

Alfred W. Crosby, “Infectious Disease and the Demography of the Atlantic Peoples,” Journal of World History, vol. 2:2 (1991), pp. 119-133.

Carla Rahn Philips and William D. Philips, Jr., "The Textbook Columbus: Examining the Myth," (with William D. Phillips, Jr. Humanities 12 (Sept. - Oct. 1991): 27-30.

Samuel Eliot Morison, The Great Explorers, pp. 351-547 [Columbus Voyages] pg. 549-673 [Magellan].

John H. Parry, The Discovery of the Sea, pp. 209-262. [Magellan]

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

 

V. THE FIRST ENCOUNTERS: CABRAL IN BRAZIL & DaGAMA IN INDIA

 

Required reading: 

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 175-194

William D. Phillips, Jr. & Carla R. Phillips, The Worlds of Christopher Columbus, pp. 155-181

Vaz de Caminha--Discovery of Brazil. [See Readings File for this topic]

Journal of Vasco da Gama's Journey to India [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic) 

David Northrup, “Vasco da Gama and Africa: An Era of Mutual Discovery, 1497-1800.” Journal of World History 9 (1998): 189-211.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab


VI. SEAFARING AND LIFE T SEA [MAJOR PAPER]

NOTE: The edition of the Tragic History of the Sea we use has a weird set up.  University of Minnesota Press printed materials from 3 sources without changing the pagination so there are 3 sets of pages in the book. If you get confused ask me. Page 1-30 follow the account of the Great Galleon S. Joao which comes at the beginning of the book.

Required reading:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 123-143, 198-201.

Charles R. Boxer, ed., Tragic History of the Sea, pp. 1-30 + 3 shipwreck accounts.

T. Bentley Duncan, "Navigation Between Portugal and Asia in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries," in E. J. von Kley and C. K. Pullapilly, eds., Asia and the West.  Encounters and Exchanges from the Age of Expansions. (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 1986). pp. 3-25

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic) 

M. G. Costa, ed., The Itinerario of Jeronimo Lobo, pp. 1-19

Carla Rahn Phillips, trans., “Life at Sea in the Sixteenth Century:  The Landlubber’s Lament of Eugenio de Salazar,” pp. 3-25

Charles R. Boxer, The Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800, pp. 54-112 [pb 60-125].

Samuel Eliot Morison, The Great Explorers, pp. 496-515

 

Task Type: Essay Paper

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Pages

Points Possible: 150

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

PART II: CONQUEST & COLONIZATION

 

VII. THE SPANISH IN THE NEW WORLD AND THE PORTUGUESE IN INDIA: THE 16TH CENTURY

 

Required reading:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 195-337.

Lyle N. McAlister, Spain and Portugal in the New World, 1492-1700, pp. 89-107. [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

M. N. Pearson, “India and the Indian Ocean in the Sixteenth Century, in Ashin Das Gupta & M. N. Pearson, eds., India and the Indian Ocean, 1500-1800, pp. 71-93.

Sanjay Subrahmanyam & Luis Felipe F. R. Thomaz, ‘Evolution of Empire: The Portuguese in the Indian Ocean During the Sixteenth Century,” in James D. Tracy, ed., The Political Economy of Merchant Empires: State Power and World Trade, 1350-1750 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), pp. 298-331

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab


VIII. FOUNDING OF COLONIES: EUROPEANS IN BRAZIL, THE CARIBBEAN & NORTH AMERICA, 1550-1715

 

Required reading: 

K. G. Davies, The North Atlantic World in the Seventeenth Century, pp. 35-140. [See Readings File for this topic]

C. R. Boxer, The Portuguese Seaborne Empire, 1415-1825, pp. 84-105. [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

Lyle N. McAlister, Spain and Portugal in the New World, 1492-1700, pp. pp. 108-117; 130-152; 257-266; 270-272; 280-283; 305-354.

Charles R. Boxer, The Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800, pp. 84-112 [pb 94-125].

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

IX. RIVAL EMPIRES OF TRADE IN THE INDIAN OCEAN & ASIA, 1550-1715

 

Required reading:

Bailey W. Diffie and George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 338-405.

Holden Furber, Rival Empires of Trade in the Orient, 1600-1800, pp. 31-78. [See Readings File for this topic] [THIS READING IS USED IN OTHER TOPICS]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

Charles R. Boxer, The Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800, pp. 84-112 [pb 94-125], pp. 187-214; 268-294 [pb 209-240; 302-331].

P. J. Marshall, “The English is Asia to 1700,” in Nicholas Cany, ed., The Origins of Empire, pp. 264-308

Charles R. Boxer, The Portuguese Seaborne Empire, 1415-1825, pp. 39-64

Malyn Newitt, “Portuguese Conquistadores in Eastern Africa,” History Today (30:8 (August 1980) : 19-25.

S. Arasaratnam, “India and the Indian Ocean in the Seventeenth Century,” in Ashin Das Gupta and M. N. Pearson, India and the Indian Ocean 1500-1800,” pp. 94-130

M .D. D. Newitt, East Africa and Indian Ocean Trade: 150-1800,” in Ashin Das Gupta and M. N. Pearson, India and the Indian Ocean 1500-1800,” pp. 240-275

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

PART III: ASPECTS OF COLONIAL SOCEITY

 

X. ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD: WEST AFRICA & THE AMERICAS

 

Required reading: 

K. G. Davies, The North Atlantic World in the Seventeenth Century, pp. 141-196. [See Readings File for this topic]

Mark A. Burkolder & Lyman L. Johnson, Colonial Latin America, pp. 156-193. [See Readings File for this topic]

Douglas R. Egerton et al, The Atlantic World, ch. 6 [Slave Trade] [See Readings File for this topic]

Thomas Benjamin, “Bondage. The Atlantic Planation Complex and the Cultures of Slavery,” in The Atlantic World. European, Africans, Indians and their Social History, 1400-1900, pp. 373-419 [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

Charles R. Boxer, The Portuguese Seaborne Empire, 1415-1825, pp. 84-105

Carla Rahn Phillips, "The Growth and Composition of Trade in the Iberian Empires, 1450-1750" in James D. Tracy, ed., The Rise of Merchant Empires: Long-Distance Trade in the Early Modern World, 1350-1750 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990), pp. 34-101.

John Thornton, Africa and Africans int he Making of the Atlantic World

P. E. Hair & Robin Law, “The English in Western Africa to 1700,” in Nicholas Cany, ed., The Origins of Empire, pp. 241-163.

John K. Thornton, “The Portuguese in Africa,” in Francisco Bethencourt & Diogo Ramada Curto, The Portuguese Oceanic Expansion, 1400-1800, pp. 138-160.

David Eltis & David Richardson, “The Numbers Game’ and Routes to Slavery,” Slavery and Abolition 18 (1997)

Felipe Fernandez Armesto, “Africans, the Involuntary Colonists” in Thomas Benjamin et al. eds., The Atlantic World in the Age of Empire, pp. 185-190.

Douglas R. Egerton et al, The Atlantic World, ch. 7 [Trade]

Thomas Benjamin, “Uprooted. West Africa, the Americas and the Atlantic Slave Trade,” in The Atlantic World. European, Africans, Indians and their Social History, 1400-1900, pp. 326-372.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

XI. SOCIAL DYNAMICS OF COLONIAL SOCIETIES I:  RACE RELATIONS

 

Required reading: [Some of the required reading for this topic is also useful for topic XII]

Bailey W. Diffie & George D. Winius, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580, pp. 331-335.

Lyle N. McAlister, Spain and Portugal in the New World, 1492-1700, pp. 108—132, 153-181. [See Readings File for this topic]

Holden Furber, Rival Empires of Trade in the Orient, 1600-1800, pp. 314-322. [See Readings File for this topic]

Peter C. Mancall, “Native Americans and Europeans in English America, 1500-1700,” in Nicholas Cany, ed., The Origins of Empire, pp. 328-349 [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

 

C. R. Boxer, The Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800, 215-241 [pb 241-272]

C. R. Boxer, Race Relations in the Portuguese Colonial Empire, 1415-1825

Thomas Benjamin, “Engagement. The Entangled Worlds of Indians and Europeans,” in The Atlantic World. European, Africans, Indians and their Social History, 1400-1900, pp. 273-325

Chandra Richard de Silva, ‘Beyond the Cape: The Portuguese Encounter with the Peoples of South Asia’, in Stuart B. Schwartz, ed., Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting, and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era, (Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp., 295-322.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

XII. CULTURAL CONTACTS IN COLONIAL SOCIETIES: ACCULTURATION & CHRISTIANIZATION

 

Required reading:

J. H. Parry, The Spanish Seaborne Empire, pp. 152-172. [See Readings File for this topic]

C. R. Boxer, The Portuguese Seaborne Empire, 1415-1825, pp. 65-83, 228-248. [See Readings File for this topic]

Thomas Benjamin, “Engagement. The Entangled Worlds of Indians and Europeans,” in The Atlantic World. European, Africans, Indians and their Social History, 1400-1900, pp. 299-313. [See Readings File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading: (Guide for those seeking more information on the topic)

C. R. Boxer, The Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800, pp. 113-186 [pb 126-208]

C. R. de Silva, ‘Beyond the Cape: The Portuguese Encounter with the Peoples of South Asia’, in Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting, and Reflecting on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era, Stuart B. Schwartz (ed.), (Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp., pp. 295-322.

Dauril Alden, “Jesuit Explorers in Padroado Asia, 1541-1721,” in George D. Winius, ed., Portugal, the Pathfinder, pp. 313-328.

Teotonio R. deSouza, “The Portuguese Discovery and the Jesuit “Conquest” of Japan,” in Francis A. Dutra & Joao Camilo dos Santos, eds, The Portuguese and the Pacific, 250-259.

Serge Gruzinski, The Mestizo Mind: The Intellectual Dynamics of Colonization and Globalization, pp. 33-63 [‘The Shock of Conquest’, and ‘Westernization’].

Thomas Benjamin, “Engagement. The Entangled Worlds of Indians and Europeans,” in The Atlantic World. European, Africans, Indians and their Social History, 1400-1900, pp. 273-325

C. R. Boxer, The Church Militant and Iberian Expansion, 1440-1770, pp. 1-121.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

 

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

Additional Items


How this course came to be:

This course has its origins in the work of the English historians Charles R Boxer (1904-2000) and J. H. Parry (1914-1982).  Boxer was the leading scholar of the Portuguese empire in the English speaking world and Parry was a scholar of the Spanish Empire. Boxer's, Portuguese Seaborne Empire, 1415-1825 and Dutch Seaborne Empire, 1600-1800 and J. H. Parry The Spanish Seaborne Empire, and Age of Reconnaissance. Discovery, Exploration and Settlement 1450-1650 became the basic texts for courses on European expansion in the 1960s and 1970s. Today these classics are still worth reading. In the 1970s and 1980s the publication by the University of Minnesota Press of the 10 volume series Europe and the World in the Age of Expansion edited by Boyd C. Shafer represented the next stage in writing the history of European Expansion.   Volume. 1 of this series is our main textbook, Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580 by Bailey Diffie and George Winius.  Volume 2, Rival Empire s of Trade in the Orient, 1600-1800 by Holden Furber, v. 3, Spain and Portugal in the New World, 1492-1700 by Lyle N. McAlister and v. 4 The North Atlantic World in the Seventeenth Century by K. G. Davies also cover the period of this course. Also in the early 1970s Samuel Elliott Morrison published his 2-volume work entitled the European Discovery of America which was latter abridged as the Great Explorers. The European Discovery of America. In the 1990s the 500 anniversary of several voyages of discovery led to the publications of a large number of works on Columbus, daGama and the other explorers providing new insights into their role in voyages of discovery. Among these we can mentioning the work of G. V. Scammell, Anthony R. Disney, Carla Rahn Philips, Francis A. Dutra, Sanjay Subrahmanuam and A. J. R. Russell-Wood. These works became the basis of various courses on European expansion taught by scholars across the U.S. While we do not read most of these works in this courses we do acknowledge the outstanding work of these scholars that made this course possible.

HISTORY PAPER WRITING SUGGESTIONS:

    1. Grammar and Spelling must be at university level.
      1. Have someone else proofread your papers since you are likely to miss your own errors.  Use a spelling Checker.

      2. Poorly written papers will be returned ungraded and must be resubmitted with-in an agreed time or the Student will receive an "F" grade.

    2. All papers must be typed, double spaced and with one-inch margins.  Use Black Ink and 12 point times or courier font.  Also, use a ribbon which is not designed to accelerate your readers blindness.
    3. Writing Tips:
      1. In history you are talking about the past, therefore, you should use past tense.

      2. Introduction Make the purpose and organization of your paper clear to the reader immediately.

        1. Tell the reader in the introduction what your thesis is and how you will demonstrate it.

        2. Avoid the classic introduction that x and y civilizations have similarities and differences. (They probably do, but you should tell the reader what they are or why they exist as part of your thesis).

      3. Make sure you have a clear thesis and conclusion
        1. Structure and Argument.  Assume that you reader knows little about your topic.  Argue clearly, logically, and forcefully.  Always look at all sides of the issue.  Don’t leave room for the reader to question your argument.  Tell the reader why this event could not be different.  Make sure your argument is supported by factual examples
        2. Simplicity.  Write simple, standard English. Use definite, specific language.
          1. Do not strive for elegant, complicated and meaningless prose.
          1. Avoid clichés & Avoid jargon (that is sociological, psychological, theological, or any other kind of jargon).
      4. Evidence.  Use the assigned readings to illustrate your argument.

        1. The most persuasive evidence is that taken from primary sources.  But do not include quotations without relating them to your assignment.
        2. Avoid long quotes from secondary sources.  As a rule of thumb, quote primary sources (i.e. documents, eyewitness accounts) paraphrase secondary sources (i.e. monographs, articles).
      5. Factors to Consider:
        1. Be aware of changes over time.  What is true of Archaic Greece may not be true of Bronze age or Classical Greece.  What holds true for 19th c. Europe may not be true for 20th century Europe.
        2. Be aware of geographical variations.  What is true for Mesopotamia may not be true forRome, Western Europe orLatin America.  The way people live will vary depending on their environment.
        3. Ask how culture, tradition, geography, environment affect the way people act or react.
        4. Be aware of class and gender distinctions.  What is the class structure of this civilization? Who is telling the story? Who is it addressed to?  Is there an agenda behind this story?
        5. Most of all, remember history is the story of people like you.  There is no secret formula.
      6. Errors to Avoid:

        1. Avoid errors in chronology.
          1. ClassicalGreece could not have contributed to the development of Akkadian civilization since classicalGreece emerged 2500 years latter.
          2. A persons productivity always declines when they die.  However, their influence may grow.
        2. Avoid Plagiarism.
          1. Make sure your paper is well documented. Cite your sources!  (SEE Sample CitatiHandout
          2. You will likely have at least one citation per paragraph and in some cases you will have several.
          3. Make sure you have a bibliography with the citations in proper bibliographical format
      7. Presentation:

        1. Use white paper
        2. Use a title page.  INCLUDE: Title of paper, your name, your section time and the Professor’s name

 

Sample Citations Guide

Sample Citations1

N. = Footnote                                                                                                                                                           B. = Bibliography

 

  1. 1.        Books having one author:

N.                             1Joseph H. Lynch, The Medieval Church: A Brief History (London and New York: Longman, 1992), 33.

 

B.             Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History.London andNew York: Longman, 1992.

 

Note: Books with more than one authors follow the same format as above except for the author entry.

                Examples:  For two authors:

                N.                             2Michael Conniff and Thomas J. Davis, Title. Publisher information, date.

                B.             Conniff, Michael and Thomas J. Davis.

 

                                For three or more authors:

                N.                             3Peter N. Stearns, Michael Adas and Stuart B. Schwartz, , Title. Publisher information, date.

                B.             Stearns, Peter N., Michael Adas and Stuart B. Schwartz.

 

                In the footnotes and endnotes, for books with more than three authors, "et al." may be substituted for the authors other than

                                the first. For example, (Craig et al.).  [The abbreviation "et al." CANNOT be used in the Bibliography.]

 

                Editions: Books with editions other than the first, include the edition between the title and

                                the place of publication, (i.e. title, 3rd ed., place of publication).

 

  1. Book with an editor or compiler as the author:

N.                             4Asunción Lavrin, ed., Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America

                (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1989), 101.

 

B.             Lavrin, Asunción, ed., Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America.Lincoln andLondon:University ofNebraska Press, 1989.

                               

  1. 3.        Journal Articles:

N.                             5Mercedes Vilanova, "Anarchism, Political Participation, and Illiteracy inBarcelona

                between 1934 and 1936," America Historical Review 97, no. 1 (February 1992): 100.

 

B.             Vilanova, Mercedes. "Anarchism, Political Participation, and Illiteracy inBarcelonabetween

                                 1934 and 1936." America Historical Review 97, no. 1 (February 1992): 96-120.

 

  1. 4.        Chapter in an edited book/Collections of primary sources:

N.                             6Carla Rahn Philips, "The Growth and Composition of Trade in the Iberian Empires,

                1450-1750," in The Rise of Merchant Empires. Long Distance Trade in the Early Modern World,

                1350-1750, ed. James D. Tracy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 50.

 

B.             Philips, Carla Rahn. "The Growth and Composition of Trade in the Iberian Empires, 1450-1750,"

                                in The Rise of Merchant Empires. Long Distance Trade in the Early Modern World, 1350-

                                1750, ed. James D. Tracy, 34-101.Cambridge:CambridgeUniversity Press, 1990.

 

  1. 5.        Work with no Author: Begin with title.  For Bibliography see 2B

N.             7Epic of Gilgamesh ed. N. K. Sandars (London: Penguin Books, 1972), 100

 

  1. Scriptures (both Christian and non-Christian) [See 4B for bibliography when part of collections]

N.             8Psalm 103:1-5 (New English Bible)                            B.             The Bible (version). Publisher information, date.

 

  1. Parenthetical References may be used in the text in place of footnotes or endnotes. 

                                Use the following format:      (author's last name(s) year, page)

                                Examples: (Lynch 1992, 91) (Conniff and Davis 1994, 102) (Craig et al. 1993, 8)

                                WITH THIS FORMAT A BIBLIOGRAPHY IS MANDATORY.

 

  1. 8.        Ch. Handout or class handouts & lecture notes. Author, Title (Source and year)

                Ex. Leo XIII, Rerum Novarum (E-Handout, Spring 2003)  or Paul Brasil, World History III Lecture Notes (E-Handout Spring 2003)

 

If you are unfamiliar with the style for citations, consult either The Chicago Manual of Style, or Kate L. Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Paper, Theses, and Dissertations.




1 Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses and Dissertations, 5th ed.,

       (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1987), 175-203.

Division Policies


For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please ferfer to Policy 5.06 & Procedure 5.06.01: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Academic Dishonesty
Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in an academic exercise.
Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources,materials, or official documents of the college. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.

Student Responsibility
As outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, all North Idaho College students have both rights and responsibilities: Please access www.nic.ferpa.StudentCode/index.htm for complete information that pertains to this subject.

North Idaho College, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provides both services and accommodations to students who meet the guidelines provided in these acts.  For a complete description, please see:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/Section5/PL-5-13.pdf

Please contact the North Idaho College Center for Educational Access in Seiter Hall, Room 100 for assistance.  Phone:  208-769-5947

To withdraw from all courses a student must obtain a college withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, secure the signatures of those persons indicated on the form, and return the form to the Registrar's office. No student may withdraw from the college after the final date of withdrawal from courses except for compelling and extraordinary reasons. In such circumstances a student must petition the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for late withdrawal from college using the college withdrawal form available in the Registrar's Office.

 

For complete information regarding student withdrawals, please see the North Idaho College Policy 5.04.01:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Institutional Policies


Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct applies to any student enrolled at North Idaho College.  This includes, but is not limited to, face-to-face classes and Internet classes.

Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes:  http://www.nic.edu/calendar/

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, Edminster Student Union Building, (208) 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, (208) 769-3304) for employee issues.

Institutional Statement


DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

REMOVAL FROM CLASS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  Attendance is based on your participation in this class. Failure to attend may result in your being removed from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. You are responsible for confirming the accuracy of your attendance record.