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North Idaho College • Coeur d'Alene • Social & Behavioral Sciences • American Indian Studies


American Indian Studies AIST-101

  • Fall 2012

  • Sections 03, 04, 05

  • 3.0 Credits

  • 08/27/2012 to 12/20/2012

  • Modified 11/16/2012



Contact Information


Instructor: Kathy Lewis

Email: kllewis@nic.edu
Office: FSOQ 105
Phone: (208) 665-5077

Meeting Times


This is an internet course. Students are not required to attend on campus class meetings. There is not a set day and time that students are required to log in to the course. However students are required each week to participate and complete assignments online by the posted due dates.

Description


This course provides a general overview of Indian history, culture, philosophy, religious practices, music, art, literature, tribal law, government, and sovereignty. The course will focus on both traditional and contemporary cultures with an emphasis on issues in American Indian life. The course will also cover the origins and development of content and method in American Indian studies, focusing on patterns of persistence and change in American Indian communities, especially political, linguistic, social, legal, and cultural change. This course satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement for the A.A. degree and partially satisfies the Social Science requirement for the A.S. degree. Lecture: 3 hours per week Recommended: Completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101 and ANTH 101

Materials


Textbook Title: Native American Studies

Authors/Editors: Clara Sue Kidwell and Alan Velie

Publisher: University of Nebraska Press

Edition/Year: 1st edition/2005

Copyright: 2005 By Clara Sue Kidwell and Alan Velie

ISBN#-13: 978-0-8032-2776-7 (Cloth: alk. paper)

978-0-8032-7829-5 (pbk. : alk .paper)

ISBN-10: 0-8032-2276-0 (Cloth : alk. paper)

0-8032-7829-2 (pbk. : alk. paper)

*Students also need to have access to a computer with a word processing software program and the internet.

Outcomes


By the end of the semester, the student should be able to:

  1. Think critically about Indian/non-Indian relations including past and current issues.  This will be demonstrated through essays and/or class discussions geared toward illustrating an understanding of these relations and the different perspectives one can take on them.
  2. Demonstrate the impact of ideas of pluralism, assimilation and culture changes on American Indian cultures.  This will be demonstrated through class discussions and exam questions geared toward illustrating an understanding of these concepts.
  3. Illustrate the ethnic diversity among contemporary and past American Indian cultures, including religion, art, music, governance, etc.  This will be demonstrated through class discussions, essays and exam questions.
  4. Display an understanding of issues confrtonting contemporary American Indian cultures.  This will be demonstrated through class discussions, essays and exam questions.
  5. Outline the various bases of contemporary tribal government.  This will be demonstrated through class discussion and exam questions.
  6. Understand the perspective of diverse scholarly discciplines about American Indain and Native peoples.  This will be demonstrated through class discussions, essays and exam questions.
  7. Understand the processes of image and stereotype creation regarding American Indian peoples  This will be demonstrated through an essay question geared toward the creation of stereotypes in mass media and literature.
  8. Display an understanding of contemporary American Indian identity. This will be demonstrated through class discussions, essays and exam questions.
  9. Outline some of the contributions of American Indian cultures to non-Indian societies.  This will be demonstrated through class discussions and exam questions.

General Education Abilities

In conjunction with North Idaho College's general education mission and goals, nine general education abilities have been developed which are to be obtained and measured during the student's time at NIC.  These nine abilities are:

  1. Aesthetic Response
  2. Communication
  3. Critical/Creative Thinking and Problem Solving
  4. Historical, Cultural, Environmental and Global Reasoning
  5. Information Literacy
  6. Mathematical, Scientific and Symbolic Reasoning
  7. Social Responsibility/Citizenship
  8. Valuing/Ethical Reasoning
  9. Wellness

Historical, Cultural and Global Awareness:  In this course you will be given an historical and cultural overview of selected American Indian cultures and their life experiences.  You will also be given an historical overview of Indian/non-Indian relations and the connection between this history and current life challenges.  Your ability to do this will be measured through class discussions, essay assignments and exam questions.

Social Responsbility/Citizenship:  American Indian/non-Indian relations (past and present) and contemporary issues confronting American Indian communities provide some of the more important focuses of this course.  We will take a close look at these issues and discuss the notion of responsibility, both past and present.  This ability will be measured through class discussion, essay assignments and exam questions.

Valuing/Ethical Reasoning:  In this course you will be asked to apply, compare and contrast what you know, believe and understand toward developing an empathetic and analytical understanding of American Indian value perspectives.  Your ability to do this will be measured through class discussion, essay assignments and exam questions.



Assessment


GENERAL--This course requires fairly well-developed reading and writing skills.  Students are expected to log in, check email, keep up on the text reading, complete course work by the posted deadlines, participate in discussions, be prepared for quizzes and exams, participate in class activities and communicate with the instructor and with the other students in the course.

GRADING:  

5 Course Activity Assignments, 50 points each = 250 pts.

8 Journal Assignments, 50 points each = 400 pts.

2 Exams, 100 points each = 200 pts.

2 Quizzes, 50 pts. each = 100 Pts.

Total possible = 950 pts.

Letter grades will be assigned based upon the following percentage breakdown:

90-100% (855-950 pts.) = A

89-80% (760-854 pts.)     = B

79-70% (665-759 pts.)     = C

69-60% (570-664 pts.)     = D

59-50% (569 & below)      = F

EXAMS (200 pts.) There will be a total of 2 exams given in this course worth 100 points each and will be comprehensive.  The exams will be accessible through the course web site and will consist of a combination of essay, short answer, True and False, and multiple choice questions based on both reading and other course material.  The exams are timed and students have two attempts at the exam.  The highest score is recorded for the exam grade.

QUIZZES (100 pts.)  There will be 2 quizzes given throughout the semester and will follow the reading schedule. The quizzes will also be accessible through the course web site and will consist of true and false, multiple choice, essay and short answer questions based on both the reading and other course material.  The quizzes are timed and students have two attempts at the quiz.  The highest score is recorded for the quiz grade. 

COURSE ACTIVITY ASSIGNMENTS (250 pts.) There will be 5 course activity assignments during the semester worth 50 points each.  These course activities will be posted on the course site on the lessons page in the course activity file.  These course activity assignments include map activities, web-site review, film review, etc.

JOURNAL ASSIGNMENTS (400 pts.) There will be 8 journal assignments during the semester worth 50 points each.  The journal assignments are posted on the course site on the lessons page in each unit file.  These journal assignments follow the textbook reading assignments and may include other course material and activities.

LATE ASSIGNMENTS: Late work is typically not allowed.  Course assignments, quizzes, and exams are posted on the course site in a manner which allows for flexibility and to give students time to deal with unforeseen circumstances.   However late work is considered for extreme emergencies, which will be decided on by individual cases.  Documentation will be required for these emergency situations. Students must contact the instructor within 24 hours of the situation to be considered for approval of being able to turn in late work. Late work must be made up within one week of the assignment due date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Policies


Academic Dishonesty: Cheating, plagiarism, or any other form of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated! Anyone caught violating this policy will receive an "F" for the course and the Dean of Students will be informed of the incident.  To learn more about plagiarism and how to avoid it, please go to the following website:  http://www.plagiarism.org/

Assistance: I am more than willing to help or assist students on material presented that they do not understand.  If you need assistance, I encourage you to (1) send me a private e-mail and/or (2) call me at 208-665-5077 (my office). If you plan to be in Coeur d'Alene you can also make an appointment to see me at my office, providing our schedules mesh.  Please do not ask me questions in the weekly discussions, send me an email through the course site with any questions that you may have. 

Behavior: Even though we don't meet face-to-face, we still need to be aware of the feelings of others and behave in a mature, courteous manner in weekly discussions or via e-mail. Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated. The Dean of Students will be notified of students causing disruptive behavior.

SPECIAL RULES -- All discussions must be respectful of others. This means that you cannot assume that others automatically agree with your religious or ideological views.  This does not mean you can't disagree with someone.  Indeed, we will find that people may disagree with one another quite a bit in this class.  The key is to do it respectfully and tactfully (critically examining issues is fine, personal attacks on people because of their views is not).  Remember that this is a course in American Indian Studies. We should try to set aside our biases in our attempt to understand the beliefs of people in other cultures.

You are all here to share a common learning experience. Each of you has much to contribute. Your weekly discussion is the place where you can explore new topics and ideas together. I am sure that you can all be successful in this venture. Class Participation: Because we do not have lectures, class participation is expected--both at the level of weekly discussion and through course mail.

Extra Credit:  There are not any extra credit opportunities in this course.

Late work:  Late work is typically not allowed.  Course assignments, quizzes, and exams are posted on the course site in a manner which allows for flexibility and to give students time to deal with unforeseen circumstances.   However late work is considered for extreme emergencies, which will be decided on by individual cases.  Documentation will be required for these emergency situations. Students must contact the instructor within 24 hours of the situation to be considered for approval of being able to turn in late work. Late work must be made up within one week of the assignment due date.

Course Problems: Internet courses are sometimes prone to a number of problems. For example, the network here at school may be having difficulties or may be operating slow...this will cause frustrations at times. You might also have problems with your home computer or your Internet provider may be experiencing a high number of clients trying to log on at the same time, or a number of other factors may come into play. The key is to be flexible, have patience, and to always make sure you have backups of your work and to complete assignments in time to allow for these interruptions.  Computer problems, internet connections, and other technical problems are not an excuse for not completing course work on time.  Students should let me know if they are having difficulties or if they have found a bug in the course (and they do crop up every now and then!). If you have any problems with instruction please make an appointment to see me or call or email me--this is academic procedure. Keep in mind that I am very open to discussion and I am here to help you to the best of my ability--your education is very important to me!

Grading:  Students who feel that they need to dispute a grade on an assignment must contact the instructor within a week of the assignment grade being posted.  After the one week deadline it will be too late to dispute an assignment grade. 

Reading: With the exception of the first week, you should attempt to have all reading done prior to the week assigned.

***Special Note:  The instructor reserves the right to change or amend the course syllabus or schedule in the event of extenuating circumstances.

Schedule


Unit 1 (August 27th-September 9th)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 1 “Introduction.”

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal assignment 1 are located in the unit one folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 1 assignment is Sunday September 9th.

Discussion Assignment: Students need to complete the discussion assignment by the deadline.  This needs to be completed in order to not be dropped for non-attendance.

Course Activity Assignment: The course activity assignment #1 is due by Sunday September 9th.  The course activity assignment is the map exercise located in the unit 1 folder.

 

Unit 2 (September 10th-September 23rd)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 2 “Land and Identity.”

Quizzes: Quiz 1 covers the textbook chapters 1-2 and the deadline is Sunday September 23rd by midnight. The quiz is located in the unit 2 folder on the lessons main page. Students have two attempts at quiz 1. The quiz has 25 questions, worth 2 points each for a total of 50 points. Students have 25 minutes in which to take quiz 1. The highest score from the two attempts is recorded in the grade book. The deadline for quiz 1 is Sunday September 23rd.

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 2 assignment are located in the unit two folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 2 assignment is Sunday September 23rd.

Course Activity Assignment: The course activity assignment #2 is due by Sunday September 23rd.  The course activity assignment is the map exercise located in the unit 2 folder.

 

Unit 3 (September 24th-October 7th)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 3 “Historical Contact and Conflict.”

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 3 assignment are located in the unit three folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal assignment is Sunday October 7th.

 

Unit 4 (October 8th-October 21st) (Mid-Term Exams)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 4 “Tribal Sovereignty.”

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 4 assignment are located in the unit four folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 4 assignment is Sunday October 21st.

Exams: Mid-Term exam covers the textbook chapters 1-4 and the deadline is Sunday October 21st by midnight. The exam is located in the unit 4 folder on the lessons main page. Students have two attempts for the mid-term exam. The mid-term exam has 50 questions, worth 2 points each for a total of 100 points. Students have 50 minutes in which to take the mid-term exam. The highest score from the two attempts is recorded in the grade book. The deadline for mid-term exam is Sunday October 21st.

 

Unit 5 (October 22nd-November 4th)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 5 “Language.”

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 5 assignment are located in the unit five folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 5 assignment is Sunday November 4th.

Course Activity Assignment: The course activity assignment #4 is due by Sunday November 25th.  The course activity assignment is the web site review exercise located in the course activity folder.

 

Unit 6 (November 5th -November 18th)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 6 “Indian Aesthetics: Literature.”

Quizzes: Quiz 2 covers the textbook chapters 5-6 and the deadline is Sunday November 18th by midnight. The quiz is located in the quiz folder on the lessons main page. Students have two attempts at quiz 2. The quiz has 25 questions, worth 2 points each for a total of 50 points. Students have 25 minutes in which to take quiz 2. The highest score from the two attempts is recorded in the grade book. The deadline for quiz 2 is Sunday November 18th.

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 6 assignment are located in the unit 6 folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 6 assignment is Sunday November 18th.

Course Activity Assignment: The course activity assignment #5 is due by Sunday November 25th.  The course activity assignment is the film review assignment located in the course activity folder.

 

Unit 7 (November 19th-December 2nd)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 7 “Indian Aesthetics: Art.”

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 7 assignment are located in the unit two folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 7 assignment is Sunday December 2nd.

Course Activity Assignment: The course activity assignment #6 is due by Sunday November 25th.  The course activity assignment is the article review assignment located in the course activity folder.

 

Unit 8 (December 3rd-December 16th)

Reading: Textbook Chapter 8 “Current Status of Native American Studies.”

Journal Assignment: The instructions for the journal 8 assignment are located in the unit eight folder on the main lessons page. The deadline for the journal 8 assignment is Sunday December 16th.

 

Unit 9 (December 17th-December 20th) (Final Exams)

Exams: The final exam covers the textbook chapters 5-8 and the deadline is Wednesday December 19th by midnight. The exam is located in the unit 9 folder on the lessons main page. Students have two attempts for the final exam. The final exam has 50 questions, worth 2 points each for a total of 100 points. Students have 50 minutes in which to take the final exam. The highest score from the two attempts is recorded in the grade book. The deadline for final exam is Wednesday December 19th.

 

 

 

Additional Items


The instructor reserves the right to change the syllabus at any time as needed.

Division Policies


For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please ferfer to Policy 5.06 & Procedure 5.06.01: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Academic Dishonesty
Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in an academic exercise.
Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources,materials, or official documents of the college. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.

Student Responsibility
As outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, all North Idaho College students have both rights and responsibilities: Please access www.nic.ferpa.StudentCode/index.htm for complete information that pertains to this subject.

North Idaho College, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provides both services and accommodations to students who meet the guidelines provided in these acts.  For a complete description, please see:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/Section5/PL-5-13.pdf

Please contact the North Idaho College Center for Educational Access in Seiter Hall, Room 100 for assistance.  Phone:  208-769-5947

To withdraw from all courses a student must obtain a college withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, secure the signatures of those persons indicated on the form, and return the form to the Registrar's office. No student may withdraw from the college after the final date of withdrawal from courses except for compelling and extraordinary reasons. In such circumstances a student must petition the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for late withdrawal from college using the college withdrawal form available in the Registrar's Office.

 

For complete information regarding student withdrawals, please see the North Idaho College Policy 5.04.01:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Institutional Policies


Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct applies to any student enrolled at North Idaho College.  This includes, but is not limited to, face-to-face classes and Internet classes.

Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes:  http://www.nic.edu/calendar/

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, Edminster Student Union Building, (208) 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, (208) 769-3304) for employee issues.

Institutional Statement


DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

REMOVAL FROM CLASS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  Attendance is based on your participation in this class. Failure to attend may result in your being removed from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. You are responsible for confirming the accuracy of your attendance record.