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North Idaho College • Internet • Social & Behavioral Sciences • History


History 207E Europe in the Middle Ages HIST-207E

  • Fall 2012

  • Section 01

  • 3 Credits

  • 08/27/2012 to 12/20/2012

  • Modified 09/10/2012



Contact Information


Dr. Jim Tschen Emmons
jbemmons [at] nic [period] edu
Virtual Office Hours:
W 9-12pm & by appt

Description


This course provides an in-depth survey of the history of Europe in the Middle Ages. The class will consist of reading, discussion, lectures and media focusing on the issues and forces contributing to the history of Europe in the Middle Ages.

One and ONLY On-Campus Meeting: we will meet one time only on Sat, Sept. 8, from 1-4 pm, in LKH 243. All other instruction will be via Internet.

Materials



REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Frankforter, A. Daniel. The Medieval Millennium: An Introduction. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education. 2003.
  • Reynolds, Burnam W. Columbanus: Light on the Early Middle Ages. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education. 2012.

Primary Sources: most of these we'll examine at the Internet Medieval Sourcebook [http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.asp]; check each week's reading list to see what if any selections we'll be using.

Outcomes


  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of key ideas, diverse cultures, and events associated with medieval history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding that the behaviors of people reflect the options that a particular society allows for satisfying their basic physical and psychological needs.
  • Analyze and evaluate information and arguments, and, construct a well-supported argument with regard to the topics we cover.
  • Demonstrate skills needed to locate and organize historical information from texts, secondary sources, archaeological artifacts, art, and literature.

Course Policies



INSTRUCTOR POLICIES:
Make sure you read the syllabus, especially the policies about attendance, papers, plagiarism, etc. You will also find key information in Bb under "Information about the Course & your Instructor" in the "About this Course" folder. I will hold you to all policies.


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:
1. Participation is expected and necessary for good performance.
2. It is your responsibility to turn in all assignments.
3. Failure to complete all assignments and papers may result in failure of the course.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please go to: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ Student Code of Conduct; Policy 5.06 & Procedure: 5.06.01 Academic Dishonesty.

Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

  • Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
  • Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
  • Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in an academic exercise.
  • Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources, materials, or official documents of the college.
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.
  • Plagiarized work will receive no points and may result in failing the course; in some cases, it may also lead to severe disciplinary actions by the college—please don't chance it.


PAPER POLICY:
All papers MUST be typed in black ink with 12 POINT TIMES NEW ROMAN FONT. Late papers will be penalized if accepted. You must earn a passing grade on the paper in order to pass the class. Also, be sure to read the folder within the class site entitled "All Things Paper Writing."


GRADING
A Range = Outstanding. All assignment sections are turned in. Projects reflect thoughtful, analytical thinking and a thorough understanding of historical events and trends. Course participation and professionalism are exceptional. Misses less than 10% of classes.

B Range = All assignment sections are turned in are above average. Demonstrates understanding of historical events, but the analytical thinking is weaker than that for an "A." Misses less than of 20% classes.

C Range = Average. All assignment sections are turned in, but indicate an average understanding of historical events. Work tends to be narrative rather than analytical. There is a need for improvement AND/OR written work is "fair." Course participation or professionalism may need improvement, AND/OR misses less than 30% of classes.

D Range = Below average. All assignment sections turned in, but writing is purely narrative, there is no analysis and barely answers the question assigned AND/OR assignments are incomplete, course participation and professionalism need substantial improvement.
Misses less than 50% of classes.

F Range = Fail: Assignments are not turned in or are "late without the instructor approval" AND/OR are substantially below average and fail to answer question AND/OR participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Plagiarizing of course work or other unprofessional behavior will result in disciplinary action.



IMPORTANT: I respect you and give you my best. Please respect both me and the subject—no one says you must love it, but we're all adults and can act like it. Please complete your work on time and show one another the courtesy you'd like in discussion. Anyone found plagiarizing or otherwise cheating will be fully prosecuted. Late work will not be accepted.

Instructor reserves the right to make changes due to unforeseen circumstances


Schedule


Hist 207E Course Schedule

About the Reading: there is a lot. You should know that up front. The chapters and pages in Frankforter listed below are a starting place—I encourage you to comb the index and bibliography to follow further leads and find out more. Dito the suggested reading. The lecture notes, which you should read each week, will also help, especially for those places that Frankforter is weak (e.g. "The Other Europe," "The Renaissance," etc.).

Week 1:    Introductions; This Craft of History; The Medieval World View
        --Introducing the Course/Introducing Yourself
        --How to Read Primary Sources; History = analysis
        --Geocentrism, The Great Chain of Being, and Order

Required Reading: "How to Read a Primary Source" http://www.bowdoin.edu/writing-guides/primaries.htm ; "Using Primary Sources" http://www.thenagain.info/Classes/Basics/UsingSources.html  

Recommended Reading: "The Need for Source Criticism: A Letter from Alexander to Aristotle?" http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/alexfake.asp

Assignment:     a) Introductions
                       b) Source Analysis & Discussion



Week 2:    "The Fall of Rome" & Rome's Legacy
        --3rd century crisis
        --Rome Recovers         
        --Rome Relapses

Reading:    Frankforter, Ch. 1; Ch. 3, pp. 49-52; 65-66

Recommended Reading:
Goffart, Walter. "Rome, Constantinople, and the Barbarians." In The                American Historical Review 86:2 (Apr., 1981): 275-306.
        
Heather, Peter. "The Huns and the End of the Roman Empire in Western            Europe." In The English Historical Review 110:435 (Feb., 1995): 4-41.
        
Heather, Peter. "Why Did the Barbarian Cross the Rhine?" In Journal of           Late Antiquity 2:1 (Spring 2009): 3-29.

Moorehead, John. "The Last Years of Theoderic." In Historia: Zeitschrift            für Alte Geschichte 32:1 (1st Qtr., 1983): 106-120.
    
Assignment: Nothing, but read for next week as will look at Wks 2 & 3 together

Week 3:    Late Antiquity & Christianity
        --The Triumph of Christianity
        --Defining Orthodoxy
        --Romanitas = Christianitas

Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 2; Ch. 3, pp. 65-76

Recommended Reading:
Brown, P. R. L. "Aspects of the Christianization of the Roman Aristocracy."In The Journal of Roman Studies 51:1 & 2 (1961): 1-11.

de Ste. Croix, G. E. M. "Aspects of the 'Great' Persecution." In The Harvard Theological Review 47:2 (Apr., 1954): 75-113.


Drake, H.A. "Constantine and Consensus." In Church History 64:1 (Mar.,        1995): 1-15.

Nock, Arthur Darby. "The Emperor's Divine Comes." In The Journal of Roman Studies 37: 1 & 2 (1947): 102-116.

Rives, J. B. "The Decree of Decius and the Religion of Empire." In The        Journal of Roman Studies 89 (1999): 135-154.

Saradi-Mendelovici, Helen. "Christian Attitudes toward Pagan            Monuments in Late Antiquity and Their Legacy in Later Byzantine            Centuries." In Dumbarton Oaks Papers 44 (1990): 47-61.

Assignment: Discussion


Week 4:    Roman Heirs 1: The Byzantine Empire
        --Origins
        --Romanoi: The Empire Lives On?
        --1453: The Empire Meets its End
    
Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 4, pp. 77-83; 93-97

Recommended:

Brown, Peter. "A Dark-Age Crisis: Aspects of the Iconoclastic            Controversy." In The English Historical Review 88:346 (Jan., 1973): 1-34.

Ostrogorsky, George. History of the Byzantine State. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1969.

Pelikan, Jaroslav. The Spirit of Eastern Christendom (600-1700). The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Vol. 2. Chicago: UP, 1977.

Runciman, Steven. Byzantine Civilization. Cleveland: World Pub, 1963.

Ware, Timothy. The Orthodox Church. London: Penguin, 1997.

Williams, Stephen and Gerard Friell. "The Survival of the Eastern Roman        Empire. In History Today (Nov. 1998): 40-46.

Assignment: Nothing, but be ready to compare/contrast next week.


Week 5:    Roman Heirs 2: The Islamic World
        --Origins
        --Major Tenets & Cultural Context
        --From Spain to India: The Rapid Spread of Islam

Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 4, pp. 83-106; 160-162; 287-290

Recommended Reading:
Boone, James L. and Nancy L. Benco, "Islamic Settlement in North Africa        and the Iberian Peninsula." In Annual Review of Anthropology 28 (1999):        51-71.

Kennedy, Hugh. "From Polis to Madina: Urban Change in Late Antique and Early Islamic Syria In Past & Present 106 (Feb., 1985): 3-27.

Thomas Sizgorich, "Narrative and Community in Islamic Late Antiquity." In Past & Present 185 (2004): 9-42.

Assignment: Discussion


Week 6:    Roman Heirs 3: The Germanic Successor States
        --The Early Germans
        --Goths, Lombards, Franks, and Vandals (Oh My!)
        --Case Studies:
            -Ostrogothic Italy
            -Visigothic Spain
            -Vandal Africa    

Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 3 (review 65-76 from Wk 3 too); Ch. 5, pp. 107-       119; 120-124

Recommended Reading:
Brennan, Brian "'Episcopae': Bishops' Wives Viewed in Sixth-Century Gaul." In Church History 54:3 (Sep., 1985): 311-323.

Burns, Thomas. A History of the Ostrogoths. Indiana UP, 1991.

Daly, William M. "Clovis: How Barbaric, How Pagan?" In Speculum 69:3        (Jul., 1994): 619-664.

Geary, Partrick. Before France and Germany: The Creation and            Transformation of the Merovingian World. Oxford, 1988.

James, Edward. The Franks. Blackwell, 1988.

Moorhead, John. "Boethius and Romans in Ostrogothic Service." In        Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte 27:4 (4th Qtr., 1978): 604-612.

Wolfram, Herwig. History of the Goths. Trans. by Thomas J. Dunlap. UC        Press, 1990.

Assignment: Discussion


Week 7:    Early Medieval Europe: An Overview
        --Carolingian France
        --Anglo-Saxon England
        --The "Other Europe" Part I
            -Celtic Europe
            -Scandinavia
            -Eastern & Central Europe
            -Iberia

Reading: Frankforter--Carolingians 5, pp. 122-134; Ch. 6, pp. 137-143; 7,    pp. 170-176; Anglo-Saxon England Ch. 3, pp. 64-65; Ch. 5, 120-122; Ch. 7, 165-167; Celtic Europe, Ch. 5, pp. 119-121; Vikings, Ch. 6, 148-149; Eastern & Central Europe, Ch. 7, 173-175; Lecture Notes; Iberia, Lecture Notes [for Celtic Europe, E & C Europe, and Iberia feel free to hunt through the index in Frankforter; Lecture Notes may be more complete]; Reynolds, Burnam W. Columbanus: Light on the Early Middle Ages--ALL

Recommended Reading:
Abrams, Leslie. "Diaspora and Identity in the Viking Age." In Early Medieval Europe 20:1 (2012): 17-38.

Bitel, Lisa M. Isle of the Saints: Monastic Settlement and Christian Community in Early Ireland. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1990.

Carey, John. "Saint Patrick, the Druids, and the End of the World." In        History of Religions 36:1 (Aug., 1996): 42-53.

Charles-Edwards, T.M. Early Medieval Ireland. Cambridge, 2007.

Driscoll, Stephen T. "Picts and Prehistory: Cultural Resource Management        in Early Medieval Scotland." In World Archaeology 30:1 The Past in the Past: The Reuse of Ancient Monuments (Jun., 1998): 142-158.

Fraser, James E. "St. Columba and the Convention at Druimm Cete: Peace         and Politics at Seventh-Century Iona." In Early Medieval Europe 15:3         (2007): 315-334.

O'Hara, Alexander. "The Vita Columbani in Merovingian Gaul." In Early        Medieval Europe 17:2 (2009): 126-153.

de Paor, Liam. St. Patrick's World: The Christian Culture of Ireland's Apostolic Age. Notre Dame: UP, 1993.

Trompf, G.W. "The Concept of the Carolingian Renaissance." In Journal of the History of Ideas 34:1 (Jan. - Mar., 1973): 3-26.

Ward-Perkins, Bryan. "Why Did the Anglo-Saxons Not Become More        British?" In The English Historical Review 115:462 (Jun., 2000): 513-533.

Assignment: PAPER


Week 8:    Feudalism, Manorialism, and Monasticism
        --Those who Fight
        --Those who Work
        --Those who Pray

Reading: Frankforter, Those who Fight—Ch. 6, pp. 149-156; Those who   Work—Ch. 6, pp. 156-159; Those who Pray—pp. 26, 43-48, 74-75; Lecture Notes; Ch. 8 for changes in economy, the rise of towns, fairs, etc. to p. 208

Recommended Reading:
Crouch, David. William Marshal: Knighthood, War and Chivalry, 1147-1219 (2nd Edition). Longman (2003).

Faith, Rosamond. "Farms and Families in Ninth-century Provence." In Early Medieval Europe 18 (2010): 175-201.
        
Gies, Frances and Joseph. Life in a Medieval Village. Harper Perennial        (1991).

Hanawalt, Barbara. The Ties that Bound: Peasant Families in Medieval England. Oxford. 1989.

Head, Thomas. "Peace & Power in France around the Year 1000." In Essays in Medieval Studies 23 (2006): 1-17.

Jones, Terry. "The Knight and Chaucer's Experience of War and             Warriors." In Medieval Perspectives 17:1 (2001): 7-60.

Kaeuper, Richard W. Chivalry and Violence in Medieval Europe. Oxford (2001).

Keen, Maurice. Chivalry. Yale (2005).

Lawrence, C.H. Medieval Monasticism: Forms of Religious Life in Western Europe in the Middle Ages. 2nd Edition. New York: Longman, 1994.

Southern, R.W. Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages. London: Penguin, 1990.

Assignment: Discussion


Week 9:    The Church & the Papacy
        --Development
        --Pope & Emperor—Fun with Investiture
        --Papal Monarchy: Its Rise and Fall

Reading: Frankforter, review Ch. 2; also pp. 75-76, 177-179, 267-282;        Lecture Notes

Recommended Reading:
Frazee, Charles A. "The Origins of Clerical Celibacy in the Western Church." In Church History 57 Supplement: Centennial Issue (1988): 108-126.        

Lewis, C.S. The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature. Cambridge: UP, 1994.

Lynch, Joseph H. The Medieval Church: A Brief History (New York: Longman, 1992).

McDonald, Andrew. "Scoto-Norse Kings and the Reformed Religious Orders: Patterns of Monastic Patronage in Twelfth-Century Galloway and Argyll." In Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies 27:2 (Summer,1995): 187-219.

Russell, Jeffrey Burton. A History of Medieval Christianity: Prophecy and Order. Arlington Heights: Harlan Davidson,  Inc., 1968.

Schimmelpfennig, Bernhard. The Papacy. Translated by James Sievert. New York: Columbia UP, 1992.

Shotwell, James T., and Louise Ropes Loomis. The See of Peter. Records of Western Civilization. New York: Columbia UP, 1991.

Southern, R.W. Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages. London: Penguin, 1990.

Assignment: Nothing


Week 10:    The High Middle Ages (ca. 1000-1300) & the Usual Suspects
        --The Usual Suspects:
            -England
            -France
            -The Holy Roman Empire

Reading: Frankforter, for England Ch. 7, pp. 166-170; 173; 245-246; 251-259; for France, 171-173; 217ff., 249-259; 316-318; for Germany, 171; 173-179; 194; 262-268;297-299

Recommended Reading:
Bishop, Morris. The Middle Ages. Mariner Books (2001).        

Hollister, C. Warren. Medieval Europe: A Short History. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

Jordan, William Chester. Europe in the High Middle Ages. London. Penguin: 2002.

Lee, Jennifer. "Ad Hoc Pilgrimages and Incidental Icons: Pilgrimage and        Exterior Sculpture." In Essays in Medieval Studies 25 (2008): 19-26.

Matarasso, Pauline. The Cistercian World: Monastic Writings of the Twelfth Century. London: Penguin, 1993.

Russell, Jeffrey Burton. A History of Medieval Christianity: Prophecy and Order. Arlington Heights: Harlan Davidson, Inc., 1968.

Assignment: Discussion


Week 11:    The Crusades
        --Levant
        --Baltic
        --Iberia

Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 7, pp. 179-189; 218; 250; 256-257; 264-268; 270; 287; 296; Lecture Notes

Recommended Reading:
Irwin, Robert. "Muslim Responses to the Crusades." In History Today (April 1997): 43-49.

Barber, Malcolm. "How the West saw Medieval Islam." In History Today        (May 1997): 44-50.    
    
Barber, Malcolm. The New Knighthood: A History of the Order of the Temple. Cambridge (1995).
         
Gabrieli, Francesco, ed. Arab Historians of the Crusades. UC Press (1984).

Maalouf, Amin. The Crusades through Arab Eyes. Shocken (1989).

Nicholson, Helen. "Saints or Sinners? The Knights Templar in Medieval        Europe." In History Today (December 1994): 30-36.

Riley-Smith, Jonathan. The Crusades: A History. Yale (2005).

Riley-Smith, Jonathan. "The Motives of the Earliest Crusaders and the        Settlement of Latin Palestine, 1095-1100." In The English Historical Review 98:389 (Oct., 1983): 721-736.

Runciman, Steven. A History of the Crusades. 3 Vols. (1994).

Assignment: Discussion


Week 12:    The High Middle Ages & the Other Europe (ca. 1000-1300): The Unusual             Suspects:
        --Spain & Portugal
        --Ireland, Scotland, and Wales
        --Russia & Poland; The Balkans

Reading: Frankforter, 290-299; review Wk. 7 reading; Ch. 13, pp. 344-349; Lecture Notes

Recommended Reading:
Barrell, A.D.M. Medieval Scotland. Cambridge (2000).

Bethell, Denis. "English Monks and Irish Reform in the Eleventh and        Twelfth Centuries." In Historical Studies: Papers Read Before the Irish        Conference of Historians. T. Desmond Williams, ed. Dublin: 1969.
         

Duffy, Sean. Ireland in the Middle Ages. Palgrave MacMillan (1997).

Dvornik, Francis. The Slavs in European History and Civilization. Rutgers         (1986).

Garen, Sally. "Santa María de Melque and Church Construction under        Muslim Rule." In Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 51:3 (Sep., 1992): 288-305.

Green, Judith. "David I and Henry I." In The Scottish Historical Review 75, 1:199 (1996): 1-19.

Lowney, Chris. A Vanished World: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain. Oxford (2006).

Macquarrie, Alan. Medieval Scotland. The History Press (2004).

Martin, Janet. Medieval Russia, 980-1584. Cambridge (2007).

Nicholls, K.W. Gaelic and Gaelicized Ireland in the Middle Ages. 2nd        edition.Lilliput Pr Ltd (2004).

O'Callaghan,Joseph F. A History of Medieval Spain. Cornell (1983).

Ó’Cróinín, Dáibhí. Early Medieval Ireland, 400-1200. Longman. (1995).

Reilly, Bernard F. The Medieval Spains (Cambridge Medieval Textbooks)        Cambridge (1993).

Walker, David. Medieval Wales. Cambridge (1990).

Assignment: Discussion


Week 13:    Medieval Intellectual Culture
        --Some Could Read Latin—You Probably Can't: Why Medieval People   Weren't  Stupid (preservation and adulation for Classical authors)
        --Scholasticism: Fun with Faith & Reason
        --Jews & Muslims
        --The Arts: Troubadours, Chaucer & Dante, and Gothic Architecture
        
Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 8, pp. 208-216; Ch. 9; Ch. 11, pp. 282-287

Recommended Reading:
Artz, Frederick B., The Mind of the Middle Ages (1965).

Baldwin, John. The Scholastic Culture of the Middle Ages, 1000-1300 (1971).       

Chesterton, G.K. St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Francis of Assisi: With        Introductions by Ralph McInerny and Joseph Pearce. Ignatius Press (2002).

Cobban, Alan B. "Student Power in the Middle Ages." In History Today        (February 1980): 7-10.

Grant, Edward. The Foundations of Modern Science in the Middle Ages (1996).

Hollister, C. Warren. Medieval Europe: A Short History (1994).

Kerr, Fergus. Aquinas: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford (2009).        

Knowles, David. The Evolution of Medieval Thought. 2nd Edition. New York: Longman (1988).

Kretzman, Norman, et al., The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Disintegration of Scholasticism, 1100-1600 (1982).      

Pieper, Josef, Scholasticism: Personalities and Problems of Medieval Philosophy, trans. by Clara Winston (2001).
        

Reynolds, L.D. and N.G. Wilson, Scribes & Scholars: A Guide to the        Transmission of Greek & Latin Literature (1991).

Assignment: Discussion


Week 14:    Famine, Plague, and War: The 14th Century
        --The Famine of 1315
        --The Black Death (1348)
        --The Hundred Years War (1337-1453)
        --The Great Schism
        --Social/Political Change

Reading: Frankforter, 159; Ch. 12

Recommended Reading:
Bailey, Mark. "Peasant Welfare in England, 1290-1348." In The Economic        History Review, New Series 51:2 (May, 1998): 223-251.        

Herlihy, David. The Black Death and the Transformation of the West. Harvard (1997).

Holmes, George. Europe: Hierarchy and Revolt: 1320-1450. Wiley Blackwell (2000).

Rogers, Clifford J. "The Military Revolutions of the Hundred Years' War." In The Journal of Military History 57:2 (Apr., 1993): 241-278.

Russell, Josiah C. "Effects of Pestilence and Plague, 1315-1385." In        Comparative Studies in Society and History 8:4 (Jul., 1966): 464-473.

Tuchman, Barbara W. A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century. New York: Ballantine, 1978.

Waley, Daniel. Later Medieval Europe: 1250-1520. 3rd Edition. Longman        (2001).

Assignment: Discussion


Week 15:    The Map Starts to Take Shape: The Late Middle Ages 1300-1500
        --Strong Monarchy: England & France
        --Not so Strong Monarchy: Germany & Poland
        --Italy and Civic Life

Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 13, pp. 326-334;

Recommended Reading:
Firnhaber-Baker, Justine. "From God’s Peace to the King’s Order: Late        Medieval Limitations on Non-Royal Warfare." In Essays in Medieval Studies 23 (2006): 19-30.        

Herrin, Judith. "The Fall of Constantinople." In History Today (June 2003): 12-17.

Holmes, George. Europe: Hierarchy and Revolt: 1320-1450. Wiley Blackwell (2000).

Kaufman, Alexander. "Jack Cade's Rebellion of 1450 and the London        Midsummer Watch." In Nottingham Medieval Studies 51 (2007): 143-166.

Powell, Raymond A. "Margery Kempe: An Exemplar of Late Medieval        English Piety." In The Catholic Historical Review  89:1 (January 2003): 1-23.

Waley, Daniel. Later Medieval Europe: 1250-1520. 3rd Edition. Longman        (2001).

Watts, John. The Making of Polities: Europe, 1300-1500. Cambridge (2009).

Assignment: Discussion


Week 16:    The Idea of "The Renaissance"
        --Il Quattrocento: 1400-1500
        --I Want to be a Roman: Petrarch
        --Myths about Faith and Science (that sadly persist)

Reading: Frankforter, Ch. 13, pp. 338-340; 350-353
        

Recommended Reading:
Burke, Peter. The Italian Renaissance. Princeton (1999).

Hale, J.R. Civilization of Europe in the Renaissance. Scribner (1995).

Martin, John Jeffries, ed. The Renaissance: Italy and Abroad. Routledge        (2003).

Plumb, J.H. The Italian Renaissance. Mariner (2001).

Welch, Evelyn. Art in Renaissance Italy: 1350-1500. Oxford (2001).

Assignment: Discussion

Division Policies



For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please ferfer to Policy 5.06 & Procedure 5.06.01: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Academic Dishonesty
Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in an academic exercise.
Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources,materials, or official documents of the college. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.

Student Responsibility
As outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, all North Idaho College students have both rights and responsibilities: Please access www.nic.ferpa.StudentCode/index.htm for complete information that pertains to this subject.

North Idaho College, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provides both services and accommodations to students who meet the guidelines provided in these acts.  For a complete description, please see:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/Section5/PL-5-13.pdf

Please contact the North Idaho College Center for Educational Access in Seiter Hall, Room 100 for assistance.  Phone:  208-769-5947

To withdraw from all courses a student must obtain a college withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, secure the signatures of those persons indicated on the form, and return the form to the Registrar's office. No student may withdraw from the college after the final date of withdrawal from courses except for compelling and extraordinary reasons. In such circumstances a student must petition the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for late withdrawal from college using the college withdrawal form available in the Registrar's Office.

 

For complete information regarding student withdrawals, please see the North Idaho College Policy 5.04.01:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

 

Institutional Policies


Institutional Policies


 

Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct applies to any student enrolled at North Idaho College.  This includes, but is not limited to, face-to-face classes and Internet classes.

Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes:  http://www.nic.edu/calendar/

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, Edminster Student Union Building, (208) 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, (208) 769-3304) for employee issues.

 

Institutional Statement



DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

REMOVAL FROM CLASS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  Attendance is based on your participation in this class. Failure to attend may result in your being removed from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. You are responsible for confirming the accuracy of your attendance record.