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North Idaho College • Coeur d'Alene • Social & Behavioral Sciences • Sociology


Social Problems SOC-102

  • Fall 2012

  • Section 03

  • 3.0 Credits

  • 08/27/2012 to 12/20/2012

  • Modified 08/23/2012



Contact Information


Office Test

Instructor: Maureen Steinel

Email: mesteinel@nic.edu
Office: LKH 222
Phone: 208-769-3314

Office Hours:

Tuesday, Thursday, 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM, LKH 222

Tuesday office hours are internet.

Monday, Wednesday, 9:00 AM to 10:00 PM, LKH 222

Meeting Times


Lecture

Tuesday, 2:30 PM to 3:45 PM, LKH 241

Description


This course investigates the persistent problems of American society as they relate to values, attitudes, and social change. Application of sociological principles to the identification and analysis of selected problems will be consistently developed. SOC 102 fulfills a social science requirement for the A.A. and A.S. degrees. Lecture: 3 hours per week

Materials


Required Texts for the Course:

Eitzen, Stanley D., Maxine Baca Zinn, & Kelly Eitzen Smith. 2011. Social Problems, 12th Ed. Boston, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon.

Kozol, Jonathan. 2005. The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. New York, N.Y.: Three Rivers Press.

*Please note there will be supplemental readings which are distributed by the Instructor to be assigned periodically throughout the course. All students are expected to read supplemental readings along with the required text. Supplemental readings will be included in the exams.

Outcomes


Through reading, completing assignments, and participating in our discussion forums, students, upon completion of this course, will demonstrate their understanding of the following outcomes:

Understand the theoretical and practical basis for social problems within the U.S. This will be measured through forum activities, quizzes, and essay exams.
Develop a sound explanatory framework for understanding the structural and functional social dilemmas we discuss. This will be measured through forum activities, quizzes, and assignments.
Have a broader view of social problems in an increasingly complex global social world. This will be measured through forum activities, responses, and assignments.
Display an understanding and apply conceptual knowledge of both intended (manifest) and unintended (latent) domains of social problems in our society. This will be measured through forum activities, quizzes, and assignments.
Display knowledge of the conservative, liberal, and radical political interpretations of social problems in our society. This will be measured through forum activities, quizzes, and assignments.
Develop a desire to become more active in society to help improve some of our society's social problems. This will be measured through forum discussions.

Assessment


Methodology: The course design is student-oriented with various pedagogical techniques which include lectures, exams, written work, group work and discussions, films and internet use.

Evaluation:

Midterm and Final Exams, 75 pts. each = 150 pts.

10 Assessments/Quizzes, 15 pts. each = 150 pts.

Term paper = 250 pts.

            Term paper proposal = 50 out of 250 pts.

Participation = 50 pts. 

Total Points = 600 pts.

Breakdown

Grading Scale: Letter grades will be assigned based upon the following percentage/point breakdown:
92.5-100% (555-600 pts.) = A
90.0-92.4% (540-554 pts.) = A-
87.5-89.9% (525-539 pts.) = B+
82.5-87.4% (495-524 pts.) = B
80.0-82.4% (480-494 pts.) = B-
77.5-79.9% (465-479 pts.) = C+
72.5-77.4% (435-464 pts.) = C
70.0-72.4% (420-434 pts.) = C-
67.5-69.9% (405-419 pts.) = D+
60.0-67.4% (360-404 pts.) = D
Below 60.0% (<360 pts.) = F

Criteria

Course Requirements:

                Class participation: All students are required to participate in class and will be graded accordingly. Class participation is necessary in order to create the proper learning environment. Periodically the class will break into groups during the sessions so it is especially important that all students attend class and actively participate in class discussions. Participation grade is worth 50 pts. (This will assist students meeting the fulfillment of course objectives #1, 3, 5, 7, & 8).

                 Exams: There will be a total 10 quizzes for this course plus a midterm and final exam. Each quiz is worth 15 points for a total of 150 points. The midterm exam and the final exam are worth 75 points each for a total of 150 points toward the final grade. Total points for all exams combined equals 300 points. Make-up exams are only given under special circumstances. The final exam is not comprehensive but will cover material subsequent to the midterm exam. Exams include weekly reading assignments, films, class lectures and supplemental handouts. Exams may be administered in class or online. (This will assist students with the fulfillment of course objectives #1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 & 10).

                 Term Paper: Students are required to read Jonathan Kozol's book, The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America, as part of the course requirement. After reading Kozol, students will write a five-page term paper connecting Kozol's findings with the material we cover in class. Students are required to incorporate course material with additional resources, including one peer-reviewed journal article for the paper. Students will submit a term paper proposal which will include a thesis statement and all references to be cited in the paper. Proposals are worth 50 points toward the final term paper grade. Approved proposals with my written comments must be submitted with the final term paper. Students are required receive my approval before they begin the term paper. Papers submitted without my approval will not be accepted under any circumstances. Late proposals result in a one letter grade deduction for each day following the due date. Proposals are due October 23rd, 2012.

            Students will begin the paper by selecting one major sociological perspective (e.g., conflict theory, functionalism or symbolic interactionism) to explain the findings from Kozol's study of the educational system in their term papers. The central theme of the paper will include a solid discussion of Kozol's findings concerning the disparities within the U.S. educational system. Students will then focus the paper on the relationship between the educational system and major social problems within the U.S. For example, how does educational attainment correlate with poverty? What role does social class play in educational access? Is there a connection between educational attainment and crime? Students are required to clearly define the disparities within the educational system particularly as it relates to race and social class. Students should also demonstrate a clear understanding of the interrelated relationship between the major social institutions within U.S. society and the educational system. Students are also required to propose solutions to resolve the social inequalities discussed in their papers. Term papers must include the proper use of sociological terms/concepts and related statistics.

            The term paper and proposal must be typed, 12 point, double-spaced, Times New Roman font and follow APA style formatting. The final term paper must be turned in class with the proposal attached. Term papers are due November 27th , 2012. Late papers are deducted one letter grade for each day after the due date and are strongly discouraged. Term papers including proposals are worth 250 points toward the final grade. (This will assist students with the fulfillment of course objectives #1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, & 10).

Course Policies


                         Attendance: Students are required to attend all class sessions and must follow the standards concerning attendance as stated in the North Idaho College Catalogue. Students are deducted one letter grade after three unexcused absences.  Please contact me via email if you are unable to attend class. Excused absences are granted for illness, official college activities and immediate family illness or death.

                         Late work policy: Late work is only accepted under extreme circumstances approved by the instructor. All late work is deducted one letter grade for each day it is late based on instructor's discretion.

                        Internet Accessibility: Students need to have access to the Internet and check their school email regularly. Notifications, announcements and additional supplemental readings are distributed to students via email or through Blackboard. Students are encouraged to engage in online discussions concerning course material. This course is hybrid so students are expected to divide the course time between face-to-face interaction and internet. Lack of internet access is not an acceptable excuse for missing work.

                        Technology in the classroom: Students are encouraged to utilize technology within the classroom. Laptops, iPads, and other computers are acceptable materials in the classroom under the agreement that the computers are only being used for course note-taking or class discussion-related research. Students are not permitted to use cell phones in class unless there is a personal emergency. Distracted students who become disengaged in the class as a result of online activities will be marked absent.

                        Other: Only academically accepted websites should be accessed to retrieve material for course requirements (e.g., Wikipedia is unacceptable). Students are encouraged to meet with me during posted office hours or by appointment. Students should email me through Blackboard to schedule an appointment.  

Academic Dishonesty:

Students are expected to adhere to academic honesty policies as stated in the North Idaho College catalogue. Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated and students who violate this policy will be penalized by failing the course. Plagiarism, unauthorized collaboration on research papers, cheating on exams, submitting the same work from a previous course,  citing sources which were not properly used in paper development or incorrect credit given to sources, unethical behaviors while conducting research, and use of illicit material are all examples of academic dishonesty.

Online Policy

Online Discussion Policy: Students are expected to complete all online assignments by the due date. Student responses should reflect material that is appropriate in an academic learning environment. Offensive or inappropriate postings will automatically be removed from the forum and result in a grade of “F”. It is especially important to be considerate of other students when posting online. Responses with more than three spelling errors will be removed and students are expected to post the response correctly to receive credit for the assignment. Students are not permitted to use terms such as “LOL” or other abbreviations within the online forums. Only academically accepted websites should be accessed to retrieve material for course requirements (e.g., Wikipedia is unacceptable).

Schedule


*Please note there will be supplemental readings/films assigned periodically throughout the duration of the course. All students are expected to read supplemental readings/films along with the required text.

Tentative Reading Schedule:

Week of 8/27: Understanding Social Problems.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 1.

Required Reading: Kozol, Introduction.

Complete first week online assignments: Syllabus quiz, Table of Contents and Introductions.

Week of 9/3: Wealth and Power.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 2.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapters 1 & 2.

Exam 1 due by 9/7.

*Holiday 9/3: Labor Day.

Week of 9/10: World Population and Global Inequality.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 3.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapters 3 & 4.  

Week of 9/17: The Browning and Graying of Society.

Required Reading Eitzen, et al., chapter 5.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapter 5.

Exam 2, 9/18.

Week of 9/24: Poverty.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 7.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapters 6 & 7.

Exam 3, 9/25.

Week of 10/1: Poverty cont.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 7.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapters 8 & 9.

Exam 4, 10/2.

Week of 10/8: Racial and Ethnic Inequality.

Required Reading:  Eitzen, et al., chapter 8.

Required Reading: Perspectives on Human Differences, George Farkas: 

"The Black-White Test Score Gap" (supplemental reading).

Exam 5, 10/9.

Week of 10/15: Midterm Exams.

Midterm exam 10/16.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 8 cont.

Week of 10/22: Gender Inequality.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 9.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapter 10.

Exam 6, 10/23.

*Term Paper Proposals due, 10/23.

Week of 10/29: Crime and Drugs.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapters 12 & 13.

No class: 10/30 Advising Day.

Exam 7, 10/31.

Week of 11/5: Healthcare.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 17.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapter 12.

Disability and Ableism.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 11.

Exam 8, 11/6.

Week of 11/12: Sexual Orientation.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 10.

Required Reading: Kozol, chapter 11.

Week of 11/19: The Economy and Work.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 14.

Required Reading: Clawson & Gerstel, "Caring for Our Young: Child Care in Europe and the United States,” (supplemental reading to be distributed).

Exam 9, 11/20.

Week of 11/26: Family.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 15.

Required Reading: Perspectives on Human Differences, Alex Kotlowitz, “There Are No Children Here”, pp. 197-200.

*Term papers due 11/27.

Week of 12/3: Education.

Required Reading: Eitzen, et al., chapter 16.

Exam 10, 12/4.

Week of 12/10: Social Change.

Required Readings: Eitzen, et al., chapter 19.

*Last Day of Class, December 11th.

Week of 12/17: Final Exams.

Final Exam TBA.

Additional Items


Additional Information: All work submitted must be typed, 12 point font, Times New Roman. Late work results in a one letter grade drop for each day it is past due. Students will be assigned homework assignments throughout the semester. Supplemental reading assignments are required as part of the course material. Students are expected to contribute to discussion boards, complete film assignments and other material covered throughout the semester.

                        Internet Accessibility: Students need to have access to the Internet and check their school email regularly. Notifications, announcements and additional supplemental readings are distributed to students via email and through ANGEL. Students are encouraged to engage in online discussions concerning course material.

Division Policies


For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please ferfer to Policy 5.06 & Procedure 5.06.01: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Academic Dishonesty
Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in an academic exercise.
Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources,materials, or official documents of the college.Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.

Student Responsibility
As outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, all North Idaho College students have both rights and responsibilities: Please access www.nic.ferpa.StudentCode/index.htm for complete information that pertains to this subject.

North Idaho College, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provides both services and accommodations to students who meet the guidelines provided in these acts.  For a complete description, please see:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/Section5/PL-5-13.pdf

Please contact the North Idaho College Center for Educational Access in Seiter Hall, Room 100 for assistance.  Phone:  208-769-5947

To withdraw from all courses a student must obtain a college withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, secure the signatures of those persons indicated on the form, and return the form to the Registrar's office. No student may withdraw from the college after the final date of withdrawal from courses except for compelling and extraordinary reasons. In such circumstances a student must petition the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for late withdrawal from college using the college withdrawal form available in the Registrar's Office.

For complete information regarding student withdrawals, please see the North Idaho College Policy 5.04.01:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Institutional Policies


Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes for the fall term: November 7, 2011. 

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, ESU, 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, 769-3304) for employee issues.

Institutional Statement


DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

DROP FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  You must attend and participate in the first week of this class. Failure to do so will result in your being dropped from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. For Internet classes, attendance is based on participation in an instructional activity; you must complete the first week’s assignment(s) by the assignment due date. Drop for non-attendance occurs at 5 p.m. Pacific Time on the second Tuesday of the semester.