Internet Explorer 6 is no longer supported. Please use a newer browser.

Internet Explorer 7 is no longer supported. Please consider a newer browser.

Concourse works best with JavaScript enabled.

North Idaho College • Coeur d'Alene • Social & Behavioral Sciences • History


History of Latin America HIST-131

  • Fall 2012

  • Section 01

  • 3.0 Credits

  • 08/27/2012 to 12/20/2012

  • Modified 11/09/2012



Contact Information


Instructor: Prof. Paul D. Brasil

Email: pdbrasil@nic.edu
Office: LKH 218D
Phone: (208) 769-3397

Office Hours: MW 1:00-2:30

Online Office Hour: M 3:00-4:00;  F 1:00-5:00

Meeting Times


Internet Class. (There are NO on-campus meetings.)

Description


This course provides a survey of the historical development of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present day. The course examines the origins and legacies of economic, religious and political institutions and the cultural and social contributions of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans. Students are expected to read and write at college level and will be required to participate in discussions. It meets a cultural diversity requirement for the A.A. degree or a social science requirement for the A.A., A.S., and A.A.S. degrees. Lecture: 3 hours per week

Materials


Required Texts:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America Rev. Ed.

Linda A. Curcio-Nagy, Great Festivals Of Colonial Mexico City

Natalia Sobrevilla Perea, The Caudillo of the Andes: Andres de Santa Cruz

Victor Montejo, Testimony: Death of a Guatemalan Village

Documents & Articles (Available in topic file in the Lessons section of Course website)

 

Recommended Texts:

Leslie Bethell, ed. The Cambridge History of Latin America

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 6th ed.

Outcomes


COURSE OBJECTIVES/GENERAL EDUCATION ABILITIES for History 131:

North Idaho College has identified certain general education abilities necessary to foster student success upon completion of the A.A. and A.S. degrees. Listed below are those abilities that this particular course addresses, along with the specific objectives of HIST 131 that are pertinent to those abilities.

Demonstrate a basic understanding of key ideas, diverse cultural views, and events associated with the history of the Latin America.

Demonstrate an understanding that the behaviors of people reflect the options that a particular society allows for satisfying their basic physical and psychological needs.

Demonstrate the ability to evaluate the relative strength of a generality concerning Latin American culture in terms of the amount of evidence substantiating the statement.

Recognize the contributions of prominent Latin American authors, artists and philosophers.

Assessment


Short Answer & Discussion Boards – 900 Points--Due Date: (See Course Internet Page for due dates).

Essay Projects – 300 Points--Due Date: (See Course Internet Page for due dates).

Course Policies


Instructor reserves the right to make changes due to Unforeseen Circumstances.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITES:

1. FIRST WEEK PARTICIPATION: See Welcome Page of Blackboard for Introductions assignment. It is required of all students during the first week.

2. Attendance & Participation are expected, and are necessary for good performance.

3. Do all Required Readings from the textbook and other sources listed on the course Schedule bellow.

4. It is your responsibility to turn in all assignments

5. Failure to complete all exams and/or writing assignments may result in failure of the course.

6. Good Writing & Reading Skills. History courses are writing and reading intensive courses.  It is recommended that students have good writing and reading skills in order to succeed in history courses.

SPORTS RELATED ABSENCES:

Lecture Classes: If you are going to be absent from class because of sports, your coach needs to send me a memo listing the names of students and the date of absences at least a week in advance. Otherwise the absence will NOT be excused.

Lecture & Internet Classes: Remember that if you are going to be way because of sports or other reasons on a day when an assignment is due, you must to turn it in BEFORE the due date.

MAJOR PAPER POLICY:

All papers MUST be double spaced and printed in black ink with 12 point Courier or TNR font.

Papers should be printed into .pdf format you may do this from Word 2007 or for older versions with a freeware program called PrimoPDF.

Late papers will be penalized. No papers are accepted after the graded papers have been returned to the students. Papers must have a bibliography and source citations for every quote and paragraph.

For technical reasons a student can submit the paper by e-mail within 48 hours of due date. Assignments must then be reposted to appropriate drop box or Discussion Board as soon as possible.

Here is a list of what I look for when I grade major essay assignments:

1) Is there an INTRODUCTION? How well does it tell the reader what the paper is about?

2) Is there a CONCLUSION? How well does it sum up the paper?

3) Did the student answer questions assigned? Did the student address all the points asked for?

4) CONTENT: Did the student give examples? Facts Correct? How much detail did the student go into?

5) QUALITY OF ANALYSIS: Does the student make good use of evidence? Are the arguments coherent?

6) EVIDENCE: did the student read all the assigned reading? Does the paper provide support based on PRIMARY sources.

7) Did the student CITE THE SOURCE for each paragraph and quote in correct format?

8) Is there a BIBLIOGRAPHY in correct format?

9) QUALITY OF WRITING: Spelling! Grammar! Is the paper well organized?

SHORT ANSWER ASSIGNMENTS & DISCUSSION BOARD ASSIGNMENT POLICY:

All Discussion Board & Short Answer Assignments must be done in essay format. Each assignment must have a bibliography and source citations for every quote and paragraph.

Any assignment submitted by email for technical reasons MUST then be reposted to appropriate Assignment location as soon as it is operational.

Short Answer Assignments & Discussion Board Assignments Grading Expectations: Here is what I generally look for:

1) Did the student answer question assigned?

2) Did the student address all the points asked for?

3) How much detail did the student go into? Did the student give examples? Are facts correct?

4) Is there evidence that the student read all the assigned reading?

5) Did the student cite the source for each paragraph and quote in correct format?

6) Is there a bibliography in correct format?

UNACCEPTABLE WEBSITES:

The following websites will not be accepted in any assignments for this course.

For the purposes of accurate research, and more effective learning and research, The following websites are not accepted within any assignment submitted to this course.

as   sparknotes.com

gradesaver.com

wikipedia.com

gradebooster.com

answers.com

 

 

REASON:

These websites are not websites that have any proof of articles or research that are nor “peer reviewed” and academically accepted as accurate and factual.

For use of these Points will be deducted and will significantly reduce, by more than 25%, your grade on the assignment.

If you wish, I am more than happy to be of guidance and assistance to you as to sites, which will greatly guide and direct to earning the highest, and desired, grade possible.

Wikipedia is not an acceptable independent academic source for written assignments.

Wikipedia is not validated by expert academic peer review authorities, and is by Wikipedia’s own admission not frequently reviewed for factual validity and currency.

Wikipedia can be used as a portal to gain deeper access to specific topics from valid sources, but cannot be listed as a source on research-based papers.

Supporting Statements: The following Wikipedia Statements directly quoted from the Wikipedia.org web site to emphasize the question of validity of Wikipedia information and support this campus academic affairs policy:

WIKIPEDIA MAKES NO GUARANTEE OF VALIDITY (2007), retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Disclaimers

"Please be advised that nothing found here has necessarily been reviewed by people with the expertise required to provide you with complete, accurate or reliable information...Wikipedia cannot guarantee the validity of the information found here", and "Wikipedia is not uniformly peer reviewed".

RELIABILITY OF WIKIPEDIA (2007), retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliability_of_Wikipedia

"It (Wikipedia) provides a good starting point for research, and that articles are, in general, reasonably sound. However, it does suffer from omissions and inaccuracies and sometimes these can be serious."

GRADING:

A Range = Outstanding. All assignment sections are turned in. Projects reflect thoughtful, analytical thinking and a thorough understanding of historical events and trends. Course participation and professionalism are exceptional. Misses less than 10% classes.

B Range = All assignments are turned in above average, but not outstanding work. Demonstrates understanding of historical events, but the analytical thinking is weaker than that for an “A”. Misses less than 20% classes

C Range = Average. All assignments are turned in, but indicates an average understanding of historical events. Work tends to be narrative rather than analytical. There is a need for improvement AND/OR written work is "fair." Course participation or professionalism may need improvement, AND/OR misses less than 30% classes.

D Range = Below average. All assignment sections turned in, but writing is purely narrative, there is no analysis and barely answers the question assigned AND/OR assignments are incomplete, course participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Misses less than 50%.

F Range = Fail: Assignments are not turned in or are “late without the instructor approval” and/or are substantially below average and fails to answer question AND/OR participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Plagiarizing of course work or other unprofessional behavior will result in disciplinary action.

Grade Scale (Based on percentages)

 

87-89 = B+

77-79 = C+

67-69 = D+

0-59 = F

93+ = A

83-86 = B

73-76 = C

63-66 = D

 

90-92 = A-

80-82 = B-

70-72 = C-

60-62 = D-

 
 

Schedule


Assignment Due Dates will be listed on the calendar in Blackboard

Required Reading Items labeled ARTICLE or DOCUMENT are found in blackboard.

 

PART I: THE ORIGINS OF MODERN LATIN AMERICA

 

I. Ancient Kingdoms and Societies in the America 

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 37-54

ARTICLE: John M. D. Pohl, "Aztecs: A New Perspective" History Today, 52:12 (Dec. 2002): 10-17

 

Recommended Reading:

John Hemming, "The Indians of Brazil in 1500," The Cambridge History of Latin America, I, 119-144

Thomas C. Patterson, “The Inca Empire and Its Subjects,” in John E. Kicza, ed., The Indian in Latin American History. pp. 1-22

Arnold Bauer,  “The Material Landscape of Pre-Columbian America.” In Goods, Power, History: Latin America’s Material Culture, pp. 15-45.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 2-3 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

II. The Conquest & Occupation on the Americas, 1492-1570 

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., ch. 1

Camilla Townsend, “Burying the White Gods: New Perspectives on the Conquest of Mexico.” The American Historical Review, vol. 108 (3), 2003.

 

Recommended Reading:

Charles J. Biskho, “The Peninsular Background to Latin American Cattle-Ranching”, Hispanic American Historical Review, 32 (1952), pp. 491-515.

Grant D. Jones, “AhChan: The Conquest of the Itza Maya Kingdom,” in Kenneth Andrien, J., ed., The Human Tradition in Colonial Latin America, pp. 164-188.

Inga Clendinnen, "'Fierce and Unnatural Cruelty': Cortés and the Conquest of Mexico," Representations Special Issue: The New World v.33 (Winter 1991), 33: 65-100.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

III. Government & Power in Colonial Latin America

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 55-81, 91-98, 108-115, 178-83

Linda A. Curcio-Nagy,  The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity

Document: Bishop Toral letter to Philip II about the Governor of Yucatan

ARTICLE: John Lynch, “The Institutional Framework of Colonial Spanish America." Journal of Latin American Studies" 24 (1992): 69-81.

 

Recommended Reading:

Stuart B. Schwartz, “Magistracy and Society in Colonial Brazil,” Hispanic American Historical Review, 50:4 (November 1970)

James Lockhart. “The Magistrates of Zacualpan. ”In James Lockhart, Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Central Mexican History and Philology, pp. 243-61

A. J. R. Russell-Wood. “Local Government in Portuguese America: A Study in Cultural Divergence,” Comparative Studies in Society and History XVI:2 (March 1974) 187-231.

 

Task Type: Essay Paper

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Pages

Points Possible: 150

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

IV. Religion & Culture 

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 98-103, 133-34, 147-166, 178-83, 191-92

ARTICLE: Eduardo Hoornaert, "The Catholic Church in Colonial Brazil," The Cambridge History of Latin America I, 541-556 [See Articles File for this topic]

ARTICLE: Joseph M. Barnabas, "The Catholic Church in Spanish America," The Cambridge History of Latin America I, 511-540 [See Articles File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading:

Paul Ganster, “Churchmen,” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., Cities and Society in Colonial Latin America, pp. 137-164

Asunción Lavrin, “Female Religious,” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., Cities and Society in Colonial Latin America, pp. 165-196

Francis A. Dutra, "The Brazilian Hierarchy in the Seventeenth Century," Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia 83: 3-4 (Sept.-Dec. 1972), pp. 171-186.

John F. Schwaller, “The Clergy,” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., The Countryside in Colonial Latin America, pp. 123-146.

John F. Schwaller, “The Cathedral Chapter of Mexico in the Sixteenth Century,” Hispanic American Historical Review, 61:4 (Movember 1981) 651-674.

Patricia Seed, “The Church and the Patriarchal Family: Marriage Conflicts in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century New Spain” Journal of Family History, (Fall, 1985) 284-293.

J. Michael Francis, “In the Service of God, I order these Temples of Idolatrous Worship Razed to the Ground”: Extirpation of Idolatry and the Search for the Santuario Grande of Iguaque (Colombia, 1595),” in Richard Boyer & Geoffrey Spurling, eds., Colonial Lives: Documents on Latin American History, 1550-1850 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 39-53.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

V. Economic & Society: Production, Exchange & Daily Life

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 119-134, 183-88

ARTICLE: D. A. Brading, & Harry E. Cross, “Colonial Silver Mining: Mexicoand Peru,” Hispanic American Historical Review, 52:4 (Nov. 1973) 545-579.

ARTICLE: Stuart Schwartz, “The Landed Elite,” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., The Countryside in Colonial Latin America, pp. 97-122

 

Recommended Reading:

Stuart Schwartz, "Colonial Brazil, c. 1580-1750: plantations and peripheries," in The Cambridge History of Latin America v. II, pp

Jeremy Baskes, "Coerced or Voluntary? The Repartimiento and Market Participation of Peasants in Late Colonial Oaxaca," Journal of Latin American Studies, 28:1 (February, 1996) pp.

James Lockhart, “Encomienda and Hacienda” The Evolution of the Great Estate in the Spanish Indies.” Hispanic American Historical Review, 49:3 (August 1969) pp.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

VI. Indians under Spanish institutions

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 3-36, 75-91, 98-103, 167-70

Document: Letter of the city council of Huejotzingo to Philip II

ARTICLE: Steve J. Stern, “The Social Significance of Judicial Institutions in an “Exploitative Society”: Huamanga, Peru, 1570-1640,” in Collier et al, Inca and Aztec States, 1400-1800, pp. 289-320

 

Recommended Reading:

William B. Taylor, “Landed Society in New Spain: A View from the South” Hispanic American Historical Review, 54:3 (Aug. 1974) pp. 387-413.

Mathew Restall, “Gaspar Antonio Chi: Bridging the Conquest of Yucatán,” in Kenneth Andrien, J., ed., Human Tradition in Colonial Latin America, pp. 2-21.

Susan E. Ramirez, “Don Melchior Caruarayco: A Kuraka of Cajamarca in Sixteenth-Century Peru,” in Kenneth Andrien, J., ed., Human Tradition in Colonial Latin America, pp. 22-34.

John Hemming, “Indians and the Frontier in Colonial Brazil” in The Cambridge History of Latin America II, pp. 501-546

Charles Gibson, “Indian Societies under Spanish rule,” in The Cambridge History of Latin America, II, pp. 381-422

Karen Spalding, “Social Climbers: Changing Patters of Mobility among Indians of Colonial Peru” Hispanic American Historical Review, 50:4 (November 1970)

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

PART II: THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN LATIN AMERICA, 1750-1910

 

VII. Reorganization or Disintegration: Reform & Independence

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., ch. 6

ARTICLE: Mark A. Burkholder, “Bureaucrats” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., Cities & Society in Colonial Latin America, pp. 197-224

ARTICLE: Anthony McFarlane, “Independence and Revolution in the Americas” History Today 34, no. 3 (March 1984): 40-49

 

Recommended Reading:

John Lynch, “Simon Bolivar and the Spanish American Revolutions” History Today 33, no. 7 (July 1983): 5-11

Christon Archer, “Military” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., Cities & Society in Colonial Latin America, pp. 77-101.

Miles L. Wortman, “Bourbon Reforms in Central America, 1750-1786.” The Americas 32 (1975) pp. 222-238.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab 

 

VIII. The Quest for Order: Conservatives vs. Liberals, 1821-1890s 

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., ch. 7

Natalia Sobrevilla Perea, The Caudillo of the Andes: Andres de Santa Cruz

John Charles Chasteen, “Making Sense of Caudillos & “Revolutions” in the Nineteen Century Latin America” in Problems in Modern Latin American History. A Reader. Pp. 37-68.

 

Recommended Reading:

Charles A. Hale, “Jose Maria Luis Mora and the Structure of Mexican Liberalism,” Hispanic American Historical Review 45:2 (May 1965)

John Lynch, “Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna: Mexico 1821-1855” in Caudillos in Spanish America, 1800-1850. pp. 316-364.

 

Task Type: Essay Paper

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Pages

Points Possible: 150

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

IX. Race, Slavery & Abolition in Latin America

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 141-4, 170-4, 252-53

Michael L. Conniff & Thomas J. Davis, Africans in the Americas. A History of the Black Diaspora. Ch. 9, 11. [See Articles File for this topic]

ARTICLE: Herbert S. Klein, “Blacks” in Luisa Schell Hoberman & Susan Migden Socolow, eds., The Countryside in Colonial Latin America, pp. 167-186.

ARTICLE: Stuart B. Schwartz, “Sugar PlantationLabor and Slave Life” in Slaves, Peasants, and Rebels.  Reconsidering Brazilian Slavery. pp. 39-64

 

Recommended Reading:

Frederick P. Bowser, "Africans in Spanish American Colonial Society,” The Cambridge History of Latin America, II, 357-380.

Matthew Restall, “Black Conquistadors: Armed Africans in Early Spanish America,” The Americas 57:2 (2000).

Mary Karasch, "Zumbi of Palmares: Chalenging the Portuguese Colonial Order,"  in Kenneth Andrien, J., ed., The Human Tradition in Colonial Latin America, pp. 104-120

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

X. Tradition vs Modernity: Cultural Conflict in the Late 19th Century 

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., ch. 8

Paul Brasil, “Latin America,” in Joyce E. Salisbury, gen. ed. The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Daily Life, v. 5, pp.469-472 [Article is on Religion in the 19th century] [See Articles File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading:

William D. Raat, “Agustin Aragon and Mexico’s Religion of Humanity” Journal of InterAmerican Studies and World Affairs,11:3 (July 1969) pp. 441-457.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

PART III: NATIONALISM, DEVELOPMENT, REVOLUTION.

LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1910

 

XI. Revolutionary Option: Mexico and Cuba in the 20th Century

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 313-346, ch. 10, 12 and pp. 585-589, 610-616

ARTICLE: Alan Knight, "The Mexican Revolution" History Today 30, no. 5 (May 1980) : 28-35

 

Recommended Reading:

Cole Blasier, "Studies of Social Revolution: Origins in Mexico, Bolivia and Cuba," Latin American Research Review 2 (1967), pp. 28-64

Alan Knight, "Cardenismo: Juggernaut or Jalopy," Journal of Latin American Studies 26, No. 1 (Feb., 1994), 73-107.

Marjorie Becker, “Black and White in Color: Cardenismo and the Search for a Campesino Ideology” Comparative Studies in Society and History 29, No.3, (Jul. 1987), 453-465.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

XII. Between Tradition & Revolution: Central America  

Required Reading:

Thomas E. Skidmore and Peter H. Smith, Modern Latin America, ch. 11 (See Topic Readings file)

Victor Montejo, Testimony: Death of a Guatemalan Village

Billie R. DeWalt and Pedro Bildegaray, “The Agrarian Bases of Conflict in Central America” in Kenneth M. Coleman and George C. Herring, eds., Understanding the Central American Crisis, pp. 19-30. [See Articles File for this topic]

Kathleen M. Blee, “The Catholic Church and Central American Politics,” in Kenneth M. Coleman and George C. Herring, eds., Understanding the Central American Crisis, pp. 55-76. [See Articles File for this topic]

 

Recommended Reading:

Enrique Dussel, “The Catholic Church in Latin America since 1930,” in The Cambridge History of Latin America, VI:1 pp. 574-582.

 

Recommended Film: Romero

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

XIII. Nationalism & Devlopment: Argentina, Brazil and Chile

Required Reading:

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 346-359, 569-577, ch. 11, 13, 14 and pp. 578-585

 

Recommended Reading:

Neil C. Livingston, “Death Squads” World Affairs, 146, No. 3 (Winter, 1983-4), 239-248.

F.G. Dawson, "Latin American Debt Crises" History Today 40, no. 12 (December 1990): 9-11

Alain Rouquié, “The Military in Latin American Politics since 1930,” The Cambridge History of Latin America, VI:1 pp. 233-304

Richard Bourne, “Eva Peron," in Political Leaders of Latin America

Marysa Navarro, "Evita's Charismatic Leadership" in Michael L. Conniff ed., Latin American Populism in Comparative Perspective, pp. 47-66

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

 

 

XIV. Violence in the Andes: Colombia, Peru & Bolivia

Required Reading:

Thomas E. Skidmore and Peter H. Smith, Modern Latin America, ch. 6-7 [See Articles File for this topic]

Edwin Williamson, The Penguin History of Latin America, Rev. Ed., pp. 589-610

Malcolm Deas, “Violent Exchanges: Reflections on Political Violence in Colombia,” in David E. Apter, ed., The Legitimization of Violence, pp. 350-390. [See Articles File for this topic]

ARTICLE: Albert Berry, “Rural Poverty in Twentieth-Century Colombia” Journal of Inter-American Studies and World Affairs 20:4 (November 1978)

 

Recommended Reading:

Asuncíon Lavrin, “Women in Twentieth-Century Latin American Society,” in The Cambridge History of Latin America, VI:1, pp. 483-544

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See file for this topic in Blackboard under the Lessons tab

Additional Items


HISTORY PAPER WRITING SUGGESTIONS:

    1. Grammar and Spelling must be at university level.
      1. Have someone else proofread your papers since you are likely to miss your own errors.  Use a spelling Checker.

      2. Poorly written papers will be returned ungraded and must be resubmitted with-in an agreed time or the Student will receive an "F" grade.

    2. All papers must be typed, double spaced and with one-inch margins.  Use Black Ink and 12 point times or courier font.  Also, use a ribbon which is not designed to accelerate your readers blindness.
    3. Writing Tips:
      1. In history you are talking about the past, therefore, you should use past tense.

      2. Introduction Make the purpose and organization of your paper clear to the reader immediately.

        1. Tell the reader in the introduction what your thesis is and how you will demonstrate it.

        2. Avoid the classic introduction that x and y civilizations have similarities and differences. (They probably do, but you should tell the reader what they are or why they exist as part of your thesis).

      3. Make sure you have a clear thesis and conclusion
        1. Structure and Argument.  Assume that you reader knows little about your topic.  Argue clearly, logically, and forcefully.  Always look at all sides of the issue.  Don’t leave room for the reader to question your argument.  Tell the reader why this event could not be different.  Make sure your argument is supported by factual examples
        2. Simplicity.  Write simple, standard English. Use definite, specific language.
          1. Do not strive for elegant, complicated and meaningless prose.
          1. Avoid clichés & Avoid jargon (that is sociological, psychological, theological, or any other kind of jargon).
      4. Evidence.  Use the assigned readings to illustrate your argument.

        1. The most persuasive evidence is that taken from primary sources.  But do not include quotations without relating them to your assignment.
        2. Avoid long quotes from secondary sources.  As a rule of thumb, quote primary sources (i.e. documents, eyewitness accounts) paraphrase secondary sources (i.e. monographs, articles).
      5. Factors to Consider:
        1. Be aware of changes over time.  What is true of Archaic Greece may not be true of Bronze age or Classical Greece.  What holds true for 19th c. Europe may not be true for 20th century Europe.
        2. Be aware of geographical variations.  What is true for Mesopotamia may not be true forRome, Western Europe orLatin America.  The way people live will vary depending on their environment.
        3. Ask how culture, tradition, geography, environment affect the way people act or react.
        4. Be aware of class and gender distinctions.  What is the class structure of this civilization? Who is telling the story? Who is it addressed to?  Is there an agenda behind this story?
        5. Most of all, remember history is the story of people like you.  There is no secret formula.
      6. Errors to Avoid:

        1. Avoid errors in chronology.
          1. ClassicalGreece could not have contributed to the development of Akkadian civilization since classicalGreece emerged 2500 years latter.
          2. A persons productivity always declines when they die.  However, their influence may grow.
        2. Avoid Plagiarism.
          1. Make sure your paper is well documented. Cite your sources!  (SEE Sample CitatiHandout
          2. You will likely have at least one citation per paragraph and in some cases you will have several.
          3. Make sure you have a bibliography with the citations in proper bibliographical format
      7. Presentation:

        1. Use white paper
        2. Use a title page.  INCLUDE: Title of paper, your name, your section time and the Professor’s name

 

Division Policies


For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please ferfer to Policy 5.06 & Procedure 5.06.01: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Academic Dishonesty
Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in an academic exercise.
Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources,materials, or official documents of the college. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.

Student Responsibility
As outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, all North Idaho College students have both rights and responsibilities: Please access www.nic.ferpa.StudentCode/index.htm for complete information that pertains to this subject.

North Idaho College, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provides both services and accommodations to students who meet the guidelines provided in these acts.  For a complete description, please see:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/Section5/PL-5-13.pdf

Please contact the North Idaho College Center for Educational Access in Seiter Hall, Room 100 for assistance.  Phone:  208-769-5947

To withdraw from all courses a student must obtain a college withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, secure the signatures of those persons indicated on the form, and return the form to the Registrar's office. No student may withdraw from the college after the final date of withdrawal from courses except for compelling and extraordinary reasons. In such circumstances a student must petition the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for late withdrawal from college using the college withdrawal form available in the Registrar's Office.

 

For complete information regarding student withdrawals, please see the North Idaho College Policy 5.04.01:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Institutional Policies


Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct applies to any student enrolled at North Idaho College.  This includes, but is not limited to, face-to-face classes and Internet classes.

Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes:  http://www.nic.edu/calendar/

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, Edminster Student Union Building, (208) 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, (208) 769-3304) for employee issues.

Institutional Statement


DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

REMOVAL FROM CLASS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  Attendance is based on your participation in this class. Failure to attend may result in your being removed from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. You are responsible for confirming the accuracy of your attendance record.