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North Idaho College • Coeur d'Alene • Social & Behavioral Sciences • History


History of Africa HIST-141

  • Fall 2012

  • Section 01

  • 3.0 Credits

  • 08/27/2012 to 12/20/2012

  • Modified 11/09/2012



Contact Information


Instructor: Prof. Paul D. Brasil

Email: pdbrasil@nic.edu
Office: LKH 218D
Phone: (208) 769-3397

Live Office Hour: MW 1:00-2:30;

Online Office Hours: M 3:00-4:00; F 1:00-5:00

Meeting Times


Internet Course. (There are no On-Campus Meetings)

Description


This course is an introductory survey of Africa history from ancient times to the present. The course covers traditional political systems and culture, the impact of Christianity and Islam, the economic and political intrusion of Europe, and the development of economic and political crises in contemporary Africa. Lecture: 3 hours per week

Materials


Required Texts:

Collins, Robert and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Niane, D.T. Sundiata Revised Edition (Essex: Longman. 2006).

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. New York: Anchor Books (1995 edition).

 

Recommend Texts:

Toyin Falola, ed. Africa: Volume 1, African History before 1885 (Carolina Academic Press, 2000). [Available from Amazon.com]

Mary Lynn Rampolla, A Pocket Guide to Writing in History, 5th ed.

Outcomes


Course Objectives/Student Outcomes:

Demonstrate a basic understanding of key ideas, diverse cultures, and events associated with African History.

Demonstrate an understanding that the behaviors of people reflect the options that a particular society allows for satisfying their basic physical and psychological needs.

Analyze and evaluate information and arguments, and construct a well-supported argument with regard to African History.

Demonstrate skills needed to locate and organize historical information from texts, mass media, people and personal observation.

Assessment


Short Answer Assignments or Discussion Boards – 700 Points (See Course Web Page for due dates)

2 Essay Projects – 300 Points (See Course Web Page for due dates)

Course Policies


Instructor reserves the right to make changes due to Unforeseen Circumstances.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

1. FIRST WEEK PARTICIPATION: See Welcome Page of Blackboard for Introductions assignment. It is required of all students during the first week.

2. Attendance & Participation are expected, and are necessary for good performance.

3. Do all Required Readings from the textbook and other sources listed on the course Schedule bellow.

4. It is your responsibility to turn in all assignments

5. Failure to complete all exams and/or writing assignments may result in failure of the course.

6. Good Writing & Reading Skills. History courses are writing and reading intensive courses.  It is recommended that students have good writing and reading skills in order to succeed in history courses.

SPORTS RELATED ABSENCES:

Lecture Classes: If you are going to be absent from class because of sports, your coach needs to send me a memo listing the names of students and the date of absences at least a week in advance. Otherwise the absence will NOT be excused.

Lecture & Internet Classes: Remember that if you are going to be way because of sports or other reasons on a day when an assignment is due, you must to turn it in BEFORE the due date.

PAPER POLICY

All papers MUST be double spaced and printed in black ink with 12 point Courier or TNR font.

Papers should be printed into .pdf format you may do this from Word 2007 or for older versions with a freeware program called PrimoPDF.

Late papers will be penalized. No papers are accepted after the graded papers have been returned to the students. Papers must have a bibliography and source citations for every quote and paragraph.

For technical reasons a student can submit the paper by e-mail within 48 hours of due date. Assignments must then be reposted to appropriate drop box or Discussion Board as soon as possible.

Here is a list of what I look for when I grade major essay assignments:

1) Is there an INTRODUCTION? How well does it tell the reader what the paper is about?

2) Is there a CONCLUSION? How well does it sum up the paper?

3) Did the student answer questions assigned? Did the student address all the points asked for?

4) CONTENT: Did the student give examples? Facts Correct? How much detail did the student go into?

5) QUALITY OF ANALYSIS: Does the student make good use of evidence? Are the arguments coherent?

6) EVIDENCE: did the student read all the assigned reading? Does the paper provide support based on PRIMARY sources.

7) Did the student CITE THE SOURCE for each paragraph and quote in correct format?

8) Is there a BIBLIOGRAPHY in correct format?

9) QUALITY OF WRITING: Spelling! Grammar! Is the paper well organized?

 

SHORT ANSWER ASSIGNMENTS & DISCUSSION BOARD ASSIGNMENT POLICY:

All Discussion Board & Short Answer Assignments must be done in essay format. Each assignment must have a bibliography and source citations for every quote and paragraph.

Any assignment submitted by email for technical reasons MUST then be reposted to appropriate Assignment location as soon as it is operational.

Short Answer Assignments & Discussion Board Assignments Grading Expectations: Here is what I generally look for:

1) Did the student answer question assigned?

2) Did the student address all the points asked for?

3) How much detail did the student go into? Did the student give examples? Are facts correct?

4) Is there evidence that the student read all the assigned reading?

5) Did the student cite the source for each paragraph and quote in correct format?

6) Is there a bibliography in correct format?

UNACCEPTABLE WEBSITES

The following websites will not be accepted in any assignments for this course.

For the purposes of accurate research, and more effective learning and research, The following websites are not accepted within any assignment submitted to this course.

as   sparknotes.com

gradesaver.com

wikipedia.com

gradebooster.com

answers.com

 

 

REASON:

These websites are not websites that have any proof of articles or research that are nor “peer reviewed” and academically accepted as accurate and factual.

For use of these Points will be deducted and will significantly reduce, by more than 25%, your grade on the assignment.

If you wish, I am more than happy to be of guidance and assistance to you as to sites, which will greatly guide and direct to earning the highest, and desired, grade possible.

Wikipedia is not an acceptable independent academic source for written assignments.

Wikipedia is not validated by expert academic peer review authorities, and is by Wikipedia’s own admission not frequently reviewed for factual validity and currency.

Wikipedia can be used as a portal to gain deeper access to specific topics from valid sources, but cannot be listed as a source on research-based papers.

Supporting Statements: The following Wikipedia Statements directly quoted from the Wikipedia.org web site to emphasize the question of validity of Wikipedia information and support this campus academic affairs policy:

WIKIPEDIA MAKES NO GUARANTEE OF VALIDITY (2007), retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Disclaimers

"Please be advised that nothing found here has necessarily been reviewed by people with the expertise required to provide you with complete, accurate or reliable information...Wikipedia cannot guarantee the validity of the information found here", and "Wikipedia is not uniformly peer reviewed".

RELIABILITY OF WIKIPEDIA (2007), retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reliability_of_Wikipedia

"It (Wikipedia) provides a good starting point for research, and that articles are, in general, reasonably sound. However, it does suffer from omissions and inaccuracies and sometimes these can be serious."

GRADING

A Range = Outstanding. All assignment sections are turned in. Projects reflect thoughtful, analytical thinking and a thorough understanding of historical events and trends. Course participation and professionalism are exceptional. Misses less than 10% classes.

B Range = All assignments are turned in above average, but not outstanding work. Demonstrates understanding of historical events, but the analytical thinking is weaker than that for an “A”. Misses less than 20% classes

C Range = Average. All assignments are turned in, but indicates an average understanding of historical events. Work tends to be narrative rather than analytical. There is a need for improvement AND/OR written work is "fair." Course participation or professionalism may need improvement, AND/OR misses less than 30% classes.

D Range = Below average. All assignment sections turned in, but writing is purely narrative, there is no analysis and barely answers the question assigned AND/OR assignments are incomplete, course participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Misses less than 50%.

F Range = Fail: Assignments are not turned in or are “late without the instructor approval” and/or are substantially below average and fails to answer question AND/OR participation and professionalism need substantial improvement. Plagiarizing of course work or other unprofessional behavior will result in disciplinary action.

Grade Scale (Based on percentages)

 

87-89 = B+

77-79 = C+

67-69 = D+

0-59 = F

93+ = A

83-86 = B

73-76 = C

63-66 = D

 

90-92 = A-

80-82 = B-

70-72 = C-

60-62 = D-

 

Schedule


Assignment Due Dates will be listed on the calendar in Blackboard

Required Reading Items labeled ARTICLE or DOCUMENT are found in blackboard

TOPIC I: THE PEOPLE & GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa.Ch. 1, 13

 

Recommended Video:

Basil Davidson, Africa: A Voyage of Discovery, Program 1 - "Different but Equal”

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

TOPIC II: CLASSICAL AFRICAN CIVILIZATIONS I: EGYPT IN AFRICAN HISTORY

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Pp. 23-32

F. Afolayan, “Civilizations of the Upper Nile and North Africa,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 1, ch. 4 (esp. 73-96)

 

Recommend Reading:

http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/EGYPT/EGYPT.HTM,

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC III: CLASSICAL AFRICAN CIVILIZATIONS II: EMPIRE OF KUSH (NAPATA AND MEROE-NUBIA) & AKSUM

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Pp. 32-38

William Adams, “The First Colonial Empire: Egypt in Nubia 3200-1200 BC” Comparative Studies in Society and History 26 (1984): 36-71

L. P. Kirwan, “Nubia and Nubian Origins,” The Geographical Journal. Vol. 140: 1 (Feb., 1974), pp. 43-51

http://www.homestead.com/wysinger/mapofnubia.html

 

Recommend Reading:

F. Afolayan, “Civilizations of the Upper Nile and North Africa,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 1, ch. 4 (96-108)

William Adams, “Sacred and Secular Politics in Ancient Nubia,” World Archaeology, Vol. 6, No. 1, Political Systems (Jun., 1974), pp. 39-51

 

Recommended Video:

Basil Davidson, Africa: A Voyage of Discovery, Program 1 - "Different but Equal""--Exerpt

Henry Louis Gates, “Wonders of the African World: The Holy Land” (2000),

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

TOPIC IV: TRANS-SAHARA TRADE; WEST AFRICAN EMPIRES

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa.Ch. 6

Niane, D.T. Sundiata Revised Edition (Essex: Longman. 2006).

Susan Keech and Roderick J. McIntosh, "Finding West Africa's Oldest City," National Geographic, 162, 3 (Sept. 1982), pp. 396-418.

 

Recommend Reading: (

Nehemia Levtzion, "The Early States of the Western Sudan to 1500," in J. F. A. Ajayi, and Michael Crowder, eds., History of West Africa (3rd rev. ed.) (New York: Columbia University Press, 1985), vol. 1, pp. 138-43

J. I. Dibua, “Sudanese Kingdoms of West Africa,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 1, ch. 6.

 

Recommended Video:

B. Davidson, Africa: A Voyage of Discovery, Program 3  - "Caravans of Gold”

 

Task Type: Essay Paper

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Pages

Points Possible: 150

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC V: TRADITIONAL SOCIETY IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ch. 3-4

John C. McCall, “Social Organization in Africa,” in Phyllis M. Martin and Patrick O’Meara, eds., Africa. 3rd Edition (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1995), pp. 175-189.

Jolayemi Solanki, “Traditional Social and Political Institutions,” in Richard Olaniyan ed., African History and Culture. Lagos: Nigeria, 1982, pp. 27-36

 

Recommend Reading:

Austin M. Ahanotu, “Social Institutions,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 2, pp. 35-58.

John Lamphear, “Pastoralism,” ,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 2, pp. 161-176

Jan Vansina, "Western Bantu Expansion," Journal of African History, 25, 2 (1984), pp. 129-45.

 

Recommended Video:

Film - Religion in Africa;

Film-“A Great Tree has Fallen”

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

  

TOPIC VI: BANTU KINGDOMS OF WEST & CENTRAL AFRICA

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ch. 8-10

Chidiebere Nwaubani, “Acephalous Societies,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 1, ch. 12.

 

Recommend Reading:

Jan Vansina, "The Peoples of the Forest" in David Birmingham and Phyllis M. Martin (eds.) History of Central Africa (London: Longman, 1983), pp. 75-117.

Jolayemi Solanki, “Traditional Social and Political Institutions,” in Richard Olaniyan ed., African History and Culture. Lagos: Nigeria, 1982, pp. 27-36

Joel E. Tishken, “Central African: People and States,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 1, ch. 9.

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC VII: EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA—TRADE AND STATE FORMATION; SWAHILI CITY STATES; SOUTHERN AFRICAN STATES

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ch. 7, 11

 

Recommend Reading:

D. N. Beach, “the Zimbabwe Plateau and its People,” in History of Central Africa, David Birmingham & Phyllis M. Martin, eds., v.1, pp. 245-268 (London & New York: Longman) 1983

J. B. Peires, 'The central beliefs of the Xhosa cattle-killing', Journal of African History, 28:1 (1987) pp. 43-63

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab 

TOPIC VIII: SLAVERY & THE SLAVE TRADE

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ch. 12, 14-16

Djibril Tamsir Niane, “Africa’s Understanding of the Slave Trade” Diogenes 45:3 (Autumn 1997) : 75-90.

Paul E. Lovejoy & David Richardson, “The Business of Slaving: Pawnship in Western Africa, c. 1600-1810,” Journal of African History, Vol. 42:1 (2001), pp. 67-89

 

Recommend Reading:

Joseph E. Inikori, “Africa and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 1, ch. 17.

Paul E. Lovejoy, “The Impact of the Atlantic Slave Trade on Africa: A Review of the Literature,” Journal of African History (1989)

Lansine Kaba, “The Atlantic Slave Trade Was Not a ‘Black-on-Black Holocaust,” African Studies Review, vol. 44, no. 1 (April 2001), 1-20.

 

Recommended Video:

H. L. Gates, “Wonders of the African World: The Slave Kingdoms” (2000),

Basil Davidson, Africa: A Voyage of Discovery - Program 4, "Kings and Cities".

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC IX: THE SCRAMBLED FOR AFRICA & AND EUROPEAN TAKEOVER

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ch. 17-19

 

Recommend Reading:

David Beach, "'Chimurenga': The Shona Rising of 1896-97," Journal of African History, Vol. 20(3) 1979, pp. 395-420,.

Judith Van Allen "Sitting on a Man": Colonialism and the Lost Political Institutions of Igbo Women Canadian Journal of African Studies / Revue Canadienne des Études Africaines, 6:2, Special Issue: The Roles of African Women: Past, Present and Future (1972), pp. 165-181.

R. Waller, “The British and the Maasai, 1895-1905: Origins of an Alliance”, Journal of African History 17, 3 (1976)

J. Willis, “‘Men on the Spot,’ Labor, and the Colonial State in British East Africa: The Mombasa Water Supply, 1911-1917", International Journal of African Historical Studies 38, 1 (1995)

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC X: THE IMPACT OF THE COLONIAL ERA: COLONIES, COLONIAL ECONOMIES, LABOR REGIMES

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa. Ch. 20-21

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart.New York: Anchor Books (1995 edition).

 

Recommend Reading:

Allen Isaacman et. al., "Cotton is the Mother of Poverty: Peasant Resistance to Forced Cotton Production in Mozambique, 1938- 1961," International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 8(4), 1980), pp. 581-615,

Sheldon Gellar, “The Colonial Era,” in Phyllis M. Martin and Patrick O’Meara, eds., Africa. 3rd Edition (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1995), pp. 135-155.

Michael Crowder, "Indirect Rule: French and British Style," Africa: Journal of the International African Institute 34:3 (1964) 197-205. 

 

Recommended Video:

Ali Mazrui—“The Africans”`v.4—Tools of Imperialism

 

Task Type: Essay Paper

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Pages

Points Possible: 150

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC XI: MODERN AFRICA I: 50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa.Ch. 22, 24-25, 26

 

Recommend Reading:

Tony Thomas, “Sub-Saharan Africa: So Little Done, So
Much to Do
,” The Economist, September 7, 1996. 178-

Apollos O. Nwauwa, “The Legacies of Colonialism and the Politics  of the Cold War,” in Toyin Falola, ed., Africa, (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2000), vol. 5, ch. 1.

Edmond J. Keller, "The Revolutionary Transformation of Ethiopia's20th- Century Bureaucratic Empire," Journal of Modern Africa Studies, 19:2, (1981), 307-335.

Michael Crowder, "Whose Dream Was it Anyway? Twenty-five Years of African Independence," African Affairs, 86:342 (Jan. 1987), 7-24.

 

Recommended Video:

Ali Mazrui, The Africans v.5 --"New Conflicts"; v.6--"In Search of Stability"

 

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

TOPIC XII: MODERN AFRICA II: SOUTH AFRICA

 

Required Reading:

Robert Collins and James Burns.. A History of Sub-Saharan Africa.Ch. 19, 23

 

Recommend Reading:

Shula Marks, "Khoisan Resistance to the Dutch in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries," Journal of African History, vol. 13 (1), 1972, pp. 55-80.

Brii Maharaj, The Integrated Community that Apartheid Could Not Destroy: The Warwick AvenueTriangle in Durban, Journal of Southern African Studies Vol. 25, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 249-266

 

Recommended Video:

"History of Apartheid - A Film"

Task Type: Short Answer

Deliverable Length: 3-4 Paragraphs

Points Possible: 75

Assignment Question: See Blackboard under Lessons Tab

 

Additional Items


African Geography Study Guide

You should have knowledge of the basic geographical features of the African continent, This guide provides you with a basic list of items you should know and be able to locate on a map of Africa.

RIVERS

Limpopo

Blue Nile

Volta

Wadi   el Hammamat

Orange

White Nile

Niger

Wade   el Tumilat

Zambezi

Senegal

Benue

 

Congo/Zaire

Gambia

Juba

 

 

ISLANDS

Goree

Sao Tome

Madagascar

Kilwa

Pemba

Principe

Socotra

Mombasa

Zanribar

Fernando   Po/Bioko

Mozambique

Harne/Cerne

Comoros

Cape Verde

Arguin

Utica

Madeira

Canary

Mascarene

 

 

LAKES

Tana

Nyaza/Malawi

Turkana/Rudolph

Chad

Tanganyika/Tanzania

Victoria/Ny Puta Jallon ansa

Albert   Mobutu

 

 

 

PLACE NAMES

Futa Jallon

Gezira

Kordofan

CapePalmas

Futa   Toro

Kalahari Desert

CapeGuardfui

GulfofSirte

Tibeati

Cape Verde

Cape of Good Hope

CapeBlanco

Pezzan

Olduvai Gorge

Katanga/Shaba

Akjoujt

Transvaal

Darfur

Cabinda

Buganda

 

CITIES AND TOWNS

Ancient African Cities

Modern African Cities

Great  Zimbabwe

Gao

Accra

Khartoum

Elmina

Timbuktu

Dakar

Freetown

Benin

Aswan

Timbo

Monrovia

Mbanza/Sao  Salvador

Bobo-Dioulasso

N’Tamo/   Brazzoville

Maputo/ Lourenco-   Marques

Sijilmassa

Meroe

Kano

Cape Town

Napata

Xalindi

Calabar

Durban

Kano

Kong

Sokoto

Dar es Salaam

Adulis

Mogadishu

Luanda

Harare/Salisbury

Leptis Magna/Lepcis

Kumbi   Saleh/Ghana

Stanleyville/ Uji ji

Kinshasa/Leopoldville

Carthage

Axum

Kumsai

Ouidah

Sofala

Djenne

Ibadan

Mombasa

Ouidah/Whydah

Mombaca

Addis Ababa

Malindi

Lixua/Larache

Kumasi

Logos

 

 

AFRICAN PEOPLES (*societies are briefly described in J. Middleton, Peoples a of Africa)

Hausa*

Yoruba*

Baganda

Bobo

Ashanti*

Ibo*/   Igbo

Songhai

Senufo

Bakongo*

Mosai

Soninke/Sarakolo

Shona

Somali*

Mande/Manding*

Oromo/Galla*

Fula/Fulani

Khoi/Hottentot

Fon*

Wolof

Zulu

Kru

Fulbe   (Fula)

Yao

Kikuyu

Masai

Nyamwozi

Matabele/   Ndebele

Mandinka/   Malinke

 

HISTORY PAPER WRITING INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Grammar and Spelling must be at university level. 
      1. Have someone else proofread your papers since you are likely to miss your own errors.  Use a spelling Checker.

      2. Poorly written papers will be returned ungraded and must be resubmitted with-in an agreed time or the Student will receive an "F" grade.

    2. All papers must be typed, double spaced and with one-inch margins.  Use Black Ink and 12 point times or courier font.  Also, use a ribbon which is not designed to accelerate your readers blindness.
    3. Writing Tips:
      1. In history you are talking about the past, therefore, you should use past tense.

      2. Introduction Make the purpose and organization of your paper clear to the reader immediately.

        1. Tell the reader in the introduction what your thesis is and how you will demonstrate it.

        2. Avoid the classic introduction that x and y civilizations have similarities and differences. (They probably do, but you should tell the reader what they are or why they exist as part of your thesis).

      3. Make sure you have a clear thesis and conclusion
        1. Structure and Argument.  Assume that you reader knows little about your topic.  Argue clearly, logically, and forcefully.  Always look at all sides of the issue.  Don’t leave room for the reader to question your argument.  Tell the reader why this event could not be different.  Make sure your argument is supported by factual examples
        2. Simplicity.  Write simple, standard English. Use definite, specific language.
          1. Do not strive for elegant, complicated and meaningless prose.
          1. Avoid clichés & Avoid jargon (that is sociological, psychological, theological, or any other kind of jargon).
      4.  Evidence.  Use the assigned readings to illustrate your argument. 

        1. The most persuasive evidence is that taken from primary sources.  But do not include quotations without relating them to your assignment.
        2. Avoid long quotes from secondary sources.  As a rule of thumb, quote primary sources (i.e. documents, eyewitness accounts) paraphrase secondary sources (i.e. monographs, articles).
      5. Factors to Consider:
        1. Be aware of changes over time.  What is true of Archaic Greece may not be true of Bronze age or Classical Greece.  What holds true for 19th c. Europe may not be true for 20th century Europe.
        2. Be aware of geographical variations.  What is true for Mesopotamia may not be true forRome, Western Europe orLatin America.  The way people live will vary depending on their environment.
        3. Ask how culture, tradition, geography, environment affect the way people act or react.
        4. Be aware of class and gender distinctions.  What is the class structure of this civilization? Who is telling the story? Who is it addressed to?  Is there an agenda behind this story? 
        5. Most of all, remember history is the story of people like you.  There is no secret formula.
      6.  Errors to Avoid:

        1. Avoid errors in chronology.
          1. ClassicalGreece could not have contributed to the development of Akkadian civilization since classicalGreece emerged 2500 years latter.
          2.  A persons productivity always declines when they die.  However, their influence may grow.
        2. Avoid Plagiarism.
          1. Make sure your paper is well documented. Cite your sources!  (SEE Sample CitatiHandout
          2. You will likely have at least one citation per paragraph and in some cases you will have several.
          3. Make sure you have a bibliography with the citations in proper bibliographical format
      7.  Presentation:

        1. Use white paper
        2. Use a title page.  INCLUDE: Title of paper, your name, your section time and the Professor’s name

 

Division Policies


For a complete explanation of the North Idaho College Statement on Academic Honesty & Academic Integrity please ferfer to Policy 5.06 & Procedure 5.06.01: http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Academic Dishonesty
Violations of academic integrity involve using or attempting to use any method that enables an individual to misrepresent the quality or integrity of his or her work at North Idaho College. These violations include the following:

Cheating: using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study in any academic exercise.
Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Plagiarism: knowingly representing the words or ideas of another as one’s own in an academic exercise.
Violation of Intellectual Property: stealing, altering, or destroying the academic work of other members of the community or the educational resources,materials, or official documents of the college. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: knowingly helping another to attempt to violate any provisions of this policy.

Student Responsibility
As outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, all North Idaho College students have both rights and responsibilities: Please access www.nic.ferpa.StudentCode/index.htm for complete information that pertains to this subject.

North Idaho College, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provides both services and accommodations to students who meet the guidelines provided in these acts.  For a complete description, please see:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/Section5/PL-5-13.pdf

Please contact the North Idaho College Center for Educational Access in Seiter Hall, Room 100 for assistance.  Phone:  208-769-5947

To withdraw from all courses a student must obtain a college withdrawal form from the Registrar's Office, secure the signatures of those persons indicated on the form, and return the form to the Registrar's office. No student may withdraw from the college after the final date of withdrawal from courses except for compelling and extraordinary reasons. In such circumstances a student must petition the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee for late withdrawal from college using the college withdrawal form available in the Registrar's Office.

 

For complete information regarding student withdrawals, please see the North Idaho College Policy 5.04.01:  http://www.nic.edu/policy/ 

Institutional Policies


Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct applies to any student enrolled at North Idaho College.  This includes, but is not limited to, face-to-face classes and Internet classes.

Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes:  http://www.nic.edu/calendar/

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, Edminster Student Union Building, (208) 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, (208) 769-3304) for employee issues.

Institutional Statement


DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

REMOVAL FROM CLASS FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  Attendance is based on your participation in this class. Failure to attend may result in your being removed from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. You are responsible for confirming the accuracy of your attendance record.