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North Idaho College • Coeur d'Alene • English & Humanities • English


English Composition ENGL-101-01

  • Spring 2012

  • Section 01

  • 3.0 Credits

  • 01/09/2012 to 05/11/2012

  • Modified 01/04/2012



Contact Information


Office Test

Instructor: Lucas Brown

Email: ljbrown@nic.edu
Office: FSO 212
Phone: 769-5985

Please use the above email address to get ahold of me.  The Angel messaging service is unreliable...I often get blank messages from students or students who thought they sent me a message, but didn't.  Email works better.

Office Hours:

Monday, 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM, FSO 212
Monday, 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM, FSO 212
Wednesday, 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM, FSO 212
Thursday, 10:30 AM to 11:30 PM, FSO 212
Friday, 8:00 AM to 9:00 AM, FSO 212

Meeting Times


Lecture (section 1)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 7:00 AM to 7:50 AM, LKH 202

Description


English 101 prepares students for the demands of academic and professional writing. Students will learn processes and strategies for writing clear, precise, and accurate prose and will demonstrate their abilities in a series of expository essays. Students will also learn to read, analyze, synthesize, and respond to a collection of written texts. This course is required for all degree programs. A grade of C- or above allows the student to enroll in ENGL 102. Lecture: 3 hours per week

Materials


The Allyn & Bacon Guide to Writing, Concise Sixth Edition

Author: John D. Ramage; John C. Bean; June Johnson
Publisher: Longman
Edition: 6
ISBN: 0-205-82314-9

Cloud Atlas

Author: David Mitchell
Publisher: Random House
Edition: Paperback
ISBN: 978-0-375-50725-0

This book contains language, adult situations, and violence that some people might find offensive.  If you are the type to be offended by media that you encounter, please talk to me immediately so we can decide if you need to be in another section of the course.

Writing Matters

Author: Rebecca Howard
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Edition: 1
ISBN: 978-0-07-319139-3
Optional

Materials for In-Class Writing

Bring a notebook, pen, etc for doing writing in-class. 

Outcomes


NIC has identified nine general education abilities that students will develop during their experience here. Composition courses address communication, critical thinking, and social responsibility as stated in the General Education Abilities.

Outcomes for English 101:

After completing English 101, students should be able to

Use the writing process to create essays (primarily expository) that communicate ideas to a variety of audiences

?         Write strong, clear prose

?         Use words accurately

Write clear and direct sentences that follow conventional structure, grammar, and punctuation

Develop essays that focus on a central idea, develop the idea adequately, and show organization and unity

Read and respond thoughtfully to peers' and published authors' essays, using them as models for good writing

Recognize and avoid plagiarism

 

Minimum Guidelines:

In order to keep English 101 courses unified, instructors will

Assign to read at least ten essays in a variety of styles, modes, and purposes by both student and professional writers

Require 4000 to 5000 words of edited prose in 6 to 7 essays

 

NIC has identified nine general education abilities that students will develop during their experience here. Composition courses address communication, critical thinking, and social responsibility as stated in the General Education Abilities.

Outcomes for English 101:

After completing English 101, students should be able to

Use the writing process to create essays (primarily expository) that communicate ideas to a variety of audiences

?         Write strong, clear prose

?         Use words accurately

Write clear and direct sentences that follow conventional structure, grammar, and punctuation

Develop essays that focus on a central idea, develop the idea adequately, and show organization and unity

Read and respond thoughtfully to peers' and published authors' essays, using them as models for good writing

Recognize and avoid plagiarism

 

Minimum Guidelines:

In order to keep English 101 courses unified, instructors will

Assign to read at least ten essays in a variety of styles, modes, and purposes by both student and professional writers

Require 4000 to 5000 words of edited prose in 6 to 7 essays

 

Course Policies


Attendance

There is a direct correlation between non-attendance and failing grades.  The vast majority of students who fail college courses do so because they do not attend enough class.  The English/Modern Languages Division has agreed upon a recommendation that students not miss more than the equivalent of two weeks in a single course, which means six absences in a three-day-per-week class; however, I feel that missing even that many classes is likely to have a negative effect on your grade.

Technology

We often find our attention divided between more than one item (for example, texting a friend while an instructor is lecturing).  Despite a feeling that we are very good at this sort of "multi-tasking," several studies show that this is detrimental to both activities.  (cf. http://www.scribd.com/doc/6910385/Abuse-of-technology-can-reduce-UK-workers-intelligence)

One of the challenges of the current generation is to learn to "tune out" the constant distraction of "always-on" technology and focus on one task at a time.  With that in mind, I have no rules about texting during class; however, the student should consider the detrimental effects of such activities.

Late Work

Most jobs have deadlines.  If you miss too many deadlines, you can be reprimanded or fired.  To that end, I feel that it is important for students to turn their work on time.  I won't accept late work.

Additional Items


Writing Center

In addition to helping students with their current individual writing needs, the Writing Center upholds a student-centered
environment that stresses the relationship between strong written and oral communication skills and
success both in and beyond college. This environment not only helps students become more critical readers and
more competent writers, but also promotes their success across the curriculum and encourages life-long learning.
Click on the link below for additional information.

http://www.nic.edu/websites/index.asp?dpt=105

My writing center hours are as follows:

Monday 8-10 and 3-4.

Tuesday 11-12.

Wednesday 8-11.

Division Policies


NIC English/Modern Languages Division

 

Absences

The English/Modern Languages Division has agreed upon a recommendation that students not miss more than the equivalent of two weeks in a single course, which means six absences in a three-day-per-week class, four absences in two-day-per-week class, two absences in a one-evening-per-week class, or two weeks of online participation.

Plagiarism Policy

NIC's English Department believes strongly in the ability of its students to:

1. write works in which they use their own ideas and words

2. correctly borrow the words and ideas of others

The department's definition of plagiarism comes from the Council of Writing Programs Administrators':  In an instructional setting, plagiarism occurs when a writer deliberately uses someone else's language, ideas, or other original (no common-knowledge) material without acknowledging its source.

Behaviors considered plagiarism would include:

1. Using someone else's exact words without using direct quotes.

2. Paraphrasing or summarizing someone's words or ideas without giving credit to the source's author.

3. Submitting another's work as the student's own. This includes a purchased paper, a borrowed paper, or portions of another person's work.

 

Turnitin.com: NIC now subscribes to a plagiarism-prevention service, called Turnitin.com, which is integrated with our Angel course software. When you turn in your assignments to this site, whether during the drafting process or on a final due date, the software compares your work to many resources on the world wide web, coming up with an "authenticity" report. You will receive more information on this process in class. To avoid plagiarism, cite sources carefully.

Behavior not considered plagiarism but of concern is sloppy documentation of words and ideas borrowed from another source and/or submitting an old paper as new work without the instructor's permission.

In addition to helping students with their current individual writing needs, the Writing Center upholds a student-centered environment that stresses the relationship between strong written and oral communication skills and success both in and beyond college. This environment not only helps students become more critical readers and more competent writers, but also promotes their success across the curriculum and encourages life-long learning.

Click on the link below for additional information.

http://www.nic.edu/websites/index.asp?dpt=105


 

 

Institutional Policies


Student Responsibilities

As students undertake to fulfill the obligations and duties outlined in this document, the college community of which they are a part undertakes to respect the basic freedoms of students. In recognition of students’ rights and dignity as members of the college, North Idaho College is committed to the principles found in the NIC Student Handbook.

Center for Educational Access/Disability Support Services

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504/508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, North Idaho College provides accommodations to eligible students who experience barriers in the educational setting due to learning, emotional / mental, physical, visual, or hearing disabilities.  Instructors will provide accommodations to students only after having received a Letter of Accommodation from the Center for Educational Access. 

If a student would like to request accommodations, he or she must contact the Center for Educational Access so that a Letter of Accommodation may be sent to the instructor.  Students requesting accommodations must contact the Center for Educational Access at the beginning of each semester.

Non-Payment

By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You also understand that collection costs and legal fees will be added if the services of a collection agency are utilized.

If you are registered for a class and do not attend, you will still be liable for the tuition unless you drop the class.

Withdrawal

Last day for students to withdraw from semester-length classes for the fall term: November 7, 2011. 

Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors have the right to withdraw students for academic reasons up until the same date; in doing so, instructors must notify students through NIC e-mail within 48 hours of submitting documentation to the Registrar's office, and students have the right to appeal the instructor's decision. For more information, see the NIC Procedure: http://www.nic.edu/modules/images/websites/121/file/section5/5.04.02procedure.pdf.

Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: All withdrawals, whether for individual classes, total withdrawal from school, or instructor-initiated are not considered to be satisfactory progress for financial aid.  See the Financial Aid Satisfactory Progress Policy: http://www.nic.edu/Websites/index.asp?dpt=29&pageID=1336

Additional withdrawal information:  http://www.nic.edu/catalog

Incompletes

An incomplete is assigned only if the student has been in attendance and has done satisfactory work to within three weeks of the end of the semester (or proportional length of time for a course of less than a semester in length).  Incompletes are issued only in cases of extenuating circumstances, such as severe illness or injury.  Incompletes are not issued in cases in which the student is simply unable to complete his/her work within the specified semester or session.  If a final grade of "I" is recorded, the instructor will indicate in writing to the Registrar what the student must do to make up the deficiency.  The instructor will indicate in the written statement what permanent grade should be entered if the Incomplete is not removed by the deadline.

All incomplete grades must be removed within six weeks after the first class day of the following term, excluding the summer session.  If the Incomplete is not removed by that date, the grade reverts to the grade indicated by the instructor's written statement authorizing the incomplete.

Discrimination and Harassment

North Idaho College has a zero tolerance policy for any acts of discrimination or harassment of any kind.  For more information, please see the NIC Student Handbook, Code of Conduct Article III and Article VIII. Compliance efforts with respect to these laws and regulations are the responsibility of each member of the campus community and are under the direction of the Dean of Students Office for Student Issues (2nd floor, ESU, 676-7156) and the Human Resources Office (Sherman Administration Building, 769-3304) for employee issues.

Institutional Statement


DROP FOR NON-PAYMENT:  By registering at North Idaho College, you agree to provide payment by the due dates. You will be dropped from classes if payment is not received by  5 p.m. Pacific Time on the third day of the semester. Students on the waitlist will be given the option to register for classes after students are dropped for non-payment.

DROP FOR NON-ATTENDANCE:  You must attend and participate in the first week of this class. Failure to do so will result in your being dropped from this class and may result in your financial aid award being reduced. For Internet classes, attendance is based on participation in an instructional activity; you must complete the first week’s assignment(s) by the assignment due date. Drop for non-attendance occurs at 5 p.m. Pacific Time on the second Tuesday of the semester.